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I'm trying to format the results so that the unioned results are shown as duplicated columns. Apologies for not explaining that very well, hopefully this simplified example will demonstrate better:

select  * from (
SELECT  Id,
        SKU,
        BrandName,
        ItemName ,
        StoreName as Store1,
        Qty as Qty1,
        null as Store2,
        null  AS Qty2,
 where Stores.Id = 1
UNION ALL
SELECT  Id,
        SKU,
        BrandName,
        ItemName ,
        null as Store1,
        null as Qty1,
        StoreName as Store2,
        Qty as Qty2
 where Stores.Id = 3
)as x
     group by x.Id, etc...

So by using 'dummy' columns in the query I can return data that almost looks like I want:

Id    | SKU       | Brand  | ItemName      | Store1    | Qty1 |Store2   | Qty2
------+-----------+--------+---------------+-----------+------+---------+-----
4441  | 15JE1215  | Ibanez | Metallic Grey | NULL      | NULL | Exeter  | 1
4441  | 15JE1215  | Ibanez | Metallic Grey | London    | 895  | NULL    | NULL 

I'd like to combine these 2 rows into 1, ie replacing the NULLs with the values from the other row. I looked at PIVOT but my brain melted.

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1  
Can't you just use a FULL OUTER JOIN rather than a UNION here, joining on e.g. Id, SKU, Brand, ItemName for your example above. A full outer will deal with the cases where only one store has an entry for that set of columns, but if that never happens you could use an INNER JOIN instead. –  mc110 Aug 1 '14 at 16:14
    
Worked a treat. If you add that as an answer I'll mark it as correct. –  markpsmith Aug 1 '14 at 16:31

2 Answers 2

User inner join or left outer join

SELECT T1.Id, T1.SKU, T1.BrandName, T1.ItemName, ISNULL(T1.Store1,T2.Store1) As Store1
, ISNULL(T1.Qty1, T2.Qty1) AS Qty1, ISNULL(T1.Store2,T2.Store2) As Store2
,ISNULL(T1.Qty2, T2.Qty2) AS Qty2
FROM
(
       SELECT  Id,
        SKU,
        BrandName,
        ItemName ,
        StoreName as Store1,
        Qty as Qty1,
        null as Store2,
        null  AS Qty2,
   where Stores.Id = 1
) T1
INNER JOIN
(
    SELECT  Id,
        SKU,
        BrandName,
        ItemName ,
        null as Store1,
        null as Qty1,
        StoreName as Store2,
        Qty as Qty2
     where Stores.Id = 3
) T2 ON (T1.Id = T2.Id .. etc)
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EDIT : Apologies in advance, as I haven't given you a 'straight solution' to your problem because I feel you'll benefit far more from an answer in the spirit of 'teaching a man to fish'.

Personally I would say you need a seperate table for stores then either create a table of 'groups' or even better, have a seperate table for stock, listing every single product with the SKU, it's location, etc.

--------------
| pInfo      |
--------------
 - pRid
 - pSku
 - pName
 - pDesc
 - pImage

--------------
| pStock     |
--------------
 - pRid
 - pSku
 - pStore
 - pStatus

Every item is then accounted for and only one information entry is required which can be matched and collated with stock information with the SKU.

Instead of Store1 and Store2, just have 'Stores', and give each item in the stock table a store code (as in, every single item).

If you open more stores you can now just add another record to the stores table, instead of altering the whole structure to add a "Store3" column.

It might seem like hassle to use so many seperate tables, but it's far easier in the long run and will make automation really easy.

Similarly I would use a table of warehouses, and collate that information to create Stores.

If you really want to have that type of table structure, then collate data from the tables into a new table if that makes things easier.

Tip of the day: Break things down to atomic form & the DB will sort itself out. Also use the time wisely..

:)

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the answer, but that is exactly the structure I do have, I just simplified the query for the purposes of the question. If you look at my query I've actually left in Stores.Id from the original query. –  markpsmith Aug 4 '14 at 8:48

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