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I am reading from several files, each file is divided into 2 pieces, first a header section of a few thousand lines followed by a body of a few thousand. My problem is I need to concatenate these files into one file where all the headers are on the top followed by the body.

Currently I am using two loops: one to pull out all the headers and write them, and the second to write the body of each file (I also include a tmp_count variable to limit the number of lines to be loading into memory before dumping to file).

This is pretty slow - about 6min for 13gb file. Can anyone tell me how to optimize this or if there is a faster way to do this in python ?

Thanks!

Here is my code:

def cat_files_sam(final_file_name,work_directory_master,file_count):

    final_file = open(final_file_name,"w")

    if len(file_count) > 1:
        file_count=sort_output_files(file_count)

    # only for @ headers    
    for bowtie_file in file_count:
        #print bowtie_file
        tmp_list = []

        tmp_count = 0
        for line in open(os.path.join(work_directory_master,bowtie_file)):
            if line.startswith("@"):

            if tmp_count == 1000000:
                final_file.writelines(tmp_list)
                tmp_list = []
                tmp_count = 0

            tmp_list.append(line)
            tmp_count += 1

        else:
            final_file.writelines(tmp_list)
            break

    for bowtie_file in file_count:
        #print bowtie_file
        tmp_list = []

        tmp_count = 0
        for line in open(os.path.join(work_directory_master,bowtie_file)):
            if line.startswith("@"):
            continue
        if tmp_count == 1000000:
            final_file.writelines(tmp_list)
            tmp_list = []
            tmp_count = 0

        tmp_list.append(line)
        tmp_count += 1
        final_file.writelines(tmp_list)

    final_file.close()
share|improve this question
    
please fix the formatting of your code block; it is unreadable – msw Mar 24 '10 at 14:49
    
What is the format of the files? How do you determine the boundary between the headers and the body? – MattH Mar 24 '10 at 14:54
    
Your code is still formatted wrong. You have a syntax error after if line.startswith("@"):. – jcdyer Mar 24 '10 at 14:59
    
One point that could help you is the fact that after the @header all the remainder is the @body, which suggests that you do not need to read this part line-by-line, but can copy it as a whole. Also, I am not sure if 1M rows is the proper balance between IO write and memory, so you can play around with that as well. – van Mar 24 '10 at 15:11
    
Hi, I'm sorry about the poor formatting but in the text box everything is indented correctly and I have tried resetting tabs - possibly a problem with my browser. Will try to get it fixed soon. Thanks for all the responses! – wemmett Mar 26 '10 at 10:39

How fast would you expect it to be to move 13Gb of data around? This problem is I/O bound and not a problem with Python. To make it faster, do less I/O. Which means that you are either (a) stuck with the speed you've got or (b) should retool later elements of your toolchain to handle the files in-place rather than requiring one giant 13 Gb file.

share|improve this answer
2  
"How fast would you expect": per en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hard_disk_drive#Data_transfer_rate , 70 MB/sec (disk-to-memory & viceversa) on a typical drive, so if the data's being written to a different drive than it's being read from, considering that a good OS will overlap the operations, one could hope to move 13GB in a tad more than 3 minutes. 6 minutes is almost twice that, which suggests the program's doing twice as much I/O as is needs (or the filesystem's fragmented or the OS sucks, of course;-). The approach I suggest may reduce the I/O (not reading the files' headers twice). – Alex Martelli Mar 24 '10 at 15:48
    
But if it is not a different disk (and I bet it isn't), then this particular program is actually running almost optimally! :) – Peter Boothe Mar 27 '10 at 1:52

You can save the time it takes the 2nd time to skip the headers, as long as you have a reasonable amount of spare disk space: as well as the final file, also open (for 'w+') a temporary file temp_file, and do:

import shutil

hdr_list = []
bod_list = []
dispatch = {True: (hdr_list, final_file), 
            False: (bod_list, temp_file)}

for bowtie_file in file_count:
    with open(os.path.join(work_directory_master,bowtie_file)) as f:
        for line in f:
            L, fou = dispatch[line[0]=='@']
            L.append(f)
            if len(L) == 1000000:
                fou.writelines(L)
                del L[:]

# write final parts, if any
for L, fou in dispatch.items():
    if L: fou.writelines(L)

temp_file.seek(0)
shutil.copyfileobj(temp_file, final_file)

This should enhance your program's performance. Fine-tuning that now-hard-coded 1000000, or even completely doing away with the lists and writing each line directly to the appropriate file (final or temporary), are other options you should benchmark (but if you have unbounded amounts of memory, then I expect that they won't matter much -- however, intuitions about performance are often misleading, so it's best to try and measure!-).

share|improve this answer
1  
@Alex: need to write the last block as well after the loop – van Mar 24 '10 at 15:05
    
give a man a fish... ;) – msw Mar 24 '10 at 15:08
    
@van, you're right -- adding that. – Alex Martelli Mar 24 '10 at 15:09
    
@msw, doesn't "smell" like homework, so showing the start of an optimization seems OK to me -- it suggests idioms such as dispatching by dict, and useful stdlib modules such as shutil, so I hope it can be instructive as well as rapidly useful. – Alex Martelli Mar 24 '10 at 15:39
    
@alex, agreed in full, I'm sorry if my joke appeared critical as that wasn't intended. – msw Mar 24 '10 at 16:33

There are two gross inefficiencies in the code you meant to write (which is not the code presented):

  1. You are building up huge lists of header lines in the first major for block instead of just writing them out.
  2. You are skipping the headers of the files again in the second major for block line by line when you've already determined where the headers end in (1). See file.seek and file.tell
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the advice! I had a conversation yesterday about this with a more senior programmer and have implemented seek() and tell() in my code (I have only seen these posts now so I havent implemented any other improvements) but this has had a very small impact overall and this still takes roughly 6 minutes. I was unaware that building lists in memory is slower than writing every line individually. I thought the I/O overhead of doing this is higher than writing a whole chunk at once. I am just curious why this is the case. – wemmett Mar 26 '10 at 10:53
    
You are going to have to do the same amount i/o eventually whether you build the list in memory first or just emit it line-by-line as you read it. Things you don't do (list construction, in this case) take zero time. The library is (silently) buffering your reads and writes so not every readline (for line in f) or writeline() is actually making a disk access. – msw Mar 26 '10 at 14:34
    
That said, Alex Martelli's approach may be far more efficient and far more 'Pythonic' than the smaller optimizations I mentioned. I say "may be" as I've not measured it and oftentimes - in any language - guesses about efficiency are often incorrect. – msw Mar 26 '10 at 14:40

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