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What is a nice way to do leading dots in a table of contents with CSS?

Example:

Link.............Chapter 1
Link.............Chapter 2
Link.............Chapter 3
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1  
Have you tried a repeated background image? –  Hogan Mar 24 '10 at 15:06

7 Answers 7

up vote 17 down vote accepted

taken from catchmyfame:

"How is this done? Basically field label is wrapped in a div which has a small image of a dot applied repeatedly in the x direction as a background. This alone would cause the dots to flow under the text so to nullify that effect, the text itself is then wrapped in a span where the background color is set to match the color of the background of the containing element. Here is the CSS:

.dots { 
  background: url('dot.gif') repeat-x bottom; 
}
.field {
  background-color: #FFFFFF;
} 

To apply this to the example form, you would just use it as:

<td>
    <div class="dots">
        <span class="field">LastName</span>
    </div>
</td>

image for the dot

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This worked beautifully! Thanks! –  Bryan Denny Mar 24 '10 at 15:42

This is the best CSS-only solution I have found for this issue of dot leaders:

http://www.w3.org/Style/Examples/007/leaders.en.html

HTML

<ul class="leaders">
 <li><span>Salmon Ravioli</span> <span>7.95</span></li>
 <li><span>Fried Calamari</span> <span>8.95</span></li>
 <li><span>Almond Prawn Cocktail</span> <span>7.95</span></li>
 <li><span>Bruschetta</span> <span>5.25</span></li>
 <li><span>Margherita Pizza</span> <span>10.95</span></li>
</ul>

CSS2/CSS3

ul.leaders {
max-width: 40em;
padding: 0;
overflow-x: hidden;
list-style: none
}

ul.leaders li:before {
float: left;
width: 0;
white-space: nowrap;
content:
". . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . "
". . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . "
". . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . "
". . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . "
}

ul.leaders span:first-child {
padding-right: 0.33em;
background: white
}

ul.leaders span + span {
float: right;
padding-left: 0.33em;
background: white
}

We create the dot leaders with a ‘:before’ pseudo-element attached to the LI elements. The pseudo-element fills the whole width of the list item with dots and the SPANs are put on top. A white background on the SPANs hides the dots behind them and an ‘overflow: hidden’ on the UL ensures the dots do not extend outside the list.

I used an arbitrary 80 dots, which is enough to fill about 38em, hence the maximum width on the list.

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2  
While this link may answer the question, it is better to include the essential parts of the answer here and provide the link for reference. Link-only answers can become invalid if the linked page changes. –  Jan Turoň Apr 12 '14 at 1:35

It is possible to combine the classic technique of "leaders" described by the w3c Thanks to @nootrope with the joy of flexbox.

Here is an alternative approach, for Modern Browsers and IE 10+.

Demo: http://jsfiddle.net/tbm62z6L/2/

 .article {
   display: flex;
 }
 .article .item,
 .article .price {
   flex: 1 0 auto;
 }
 .article .dots {
   flex: 0 1 auto;
 }
 .dots::before {
   display: block;
   white-space: nowrap;
   overflow: hidden;
   text-overflow: clip;
   content: 
     ". . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . "
     ". . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . "
     ". . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . "
     ". . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . "
 }
<div class="article">
  <span class="item">sandwichtoaster</span>
  <span class="dots"></span>
  <span class="price">$35</span>
</div>

This is a very flexible way to display leading dots, using the current font and no need to use images.

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The only CSS solution that I know of for those who need a transparent background –  Ricardo Freitas Mar 31 at 3:11

I mashed-up a couple examples to create what I think is a pretty good solution. Doesn't rely on background color to hide the leader dots. Works on IE8 too.

http://jsfiddle.net/westy808/g0d8x8c5/1/

<ul class="leaders">
    <li><span>Item</span><span>12.234</span></li>
    <li><span>Another Item</span><span>1,000.25</span></li>
</ul>

ul.leaders li { clear: both; }

ul.leaders li span:first-child {
    float: left;
    padding: 0 .4em 0 0;
    margin: 0;
}
ul.leaders li span + span {
    float: right;
    padding: 0 0 0 .4em;
    margin: 0;
}

ul.leaders li:after {
    content: "";
    display: block;
    overflow: hidden;
    height: 1em;
    border-bottom: 1px dotted;
}
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Acutally the W3C has a working draft describing the functionality you are looking for

http://www.w3.org/TR/css3-gcpm/#leaders

Even back in 2005 A List Apart published an article for it. (http://www.alistapart.com/articles/boom) Unfortunately It doesn't seem to work for me and I haven't found much more. But maybe it's worth keeping it in mind that one day in the near future will be possible with CSS only :)

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The solution in the "A List Apart" article works only for some PDF Processors like Prince princexml.com, because no Browser supports the Paged Media Specification so far. w3.org/TR/css3-gcpm –  Lindemann Oct 14 '12 at 7:06
    
@Lindemann Thanks! I just found that the W3C was working on it and though maybe it will be implemented one day and it's worth knowing that it exist :) –  F Lekschas Oct 15 '12 at 11:20

Building up on @Nico O‘s answer, there is no need for the un-semantic .dots element. One can simply write

<ul class="toc">
  <li><span class="title">Foo</span>
      <span class="chapter">Chapter 1</span></li>
  <li><span class="title">Bar</span>
      <span class="chapter">Chapter 2</span></li>
</ul>

as one would expect and apply the following styles

.toc li {
  display: flex;
}
.toc li .title {
  order: 1;
}
.toc li .chapter {
  order: 3;
}
.toc li::after {
  content: "";
  border-bottom: 1px dotted;
  flex-grow: 1;
  order: 2;
}

JSFiddle here

We take advantage of the fact that we can order the children of our flex container however we want, and the fact that a pseudo element behaves like a child of where it was defined. The key is the flex-grow rule. a flex-grow of 1 while all other siblings have the default 0 will grow to the remaining space even though it has no content.

This will work until the .title and .chapter elements together fill all the space. Then the ::after pseudo element will have a width of 0 and the dotted border wont be displayed, even though the .title and .chapter will wrap their content. So if you're sure that won't happen, and your viewers use modern browsers this might be the optimal solution.

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dobon says "This method currently doesn't work in IE11 (windows 7 x64) because of the bug documented here" –  cgmb Apr 8 at 22:55
    
@dobon Thanks, I've submitted a pull request to caniuse. –  Rúnar Berg Apr 20 at 10:31

.dots { display: inline-block; width: 325px; white-space: nowrap; overflow: hidden !important; text-overflow: ellipsis; }

.dot
{
    display: inline-block;
    width: 185px;
    white-space: nowrap;
    overflow: hidden !important;
    text-overflow: ellipsis;
}

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