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I have a class I wish to Mock using Google Mock. My class has BOTH non-virtual and virtual methods. I've been reading through the Google Mock ForDummies and the Google Mock CookBook. The examples and explanations provided by these resources mention classes with either ALL virtual functions, or NO virtual functions, but not one with both. So I have two questions:

(1) Is it possible to mock a class with mixed virtual/non-virtual types?

(2) What method should be used (if question 1 is true) to mock this class, (If question 1 is false) what could be used instead?

A bit of code if it helps:

class Time_Device : public Time_Device_Interface
{   
private:
     ...
     bool read32_irig_data( uint32_t *data_read, uint32_t reg_address);
     bool thread_monitor_irig_changed( irig_callback_t callback );
public:
     ...
     virtual bool set_time( struct time_sample const &time );
     virtual bool get_time( struct time_sample *time );
     virtual bool register_is_connected_notification( 
         irig_callback_t callback );
 };

A wee bit o'background:

I'm trying to use Google Mock with Google Test because I need to mimic hardware returns in a lot of my methods in order to test coverage, etc. I've been able to successfully use Google Test alone to test some of my methods without Mocking them.

I'm developing using Visual Studio 2010, CMake

I'm new to both Google Test and Google Mock

I cannot change the production code.

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What are non-virtual methods doing? If calling virtual methods, then it will make your life difficult. –  BЈовић Aug 4 '14 at 14:49
    
@ BЈовић The non-virtual methods do not call virtual methods. They are private methods called by some of the public virtual methods. They are also the methods that access the hardware. –  TWhite Aug 4 '14 at 14:51

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

(1) Is it possible to mock a class with mixed virtual/non-virtual types?

Yes, it is, but you have to take care. In the mocked class, override only virtual methods.

The mock sould look like this :

struct Time_Device_Mock : public Time_Device_Interface
{
    MOCK_CONST_METHOD1( set_time, bool(time_sample const &) );
    MOCK_CONST_METHOD1( get_time, bool(time_sample *) );
    MOCK_CONST_METHOD1( register_is_connected_notification, bool(irig_callback_t) );
};

(2) What method should be used (if question 1 is true) to mock this class, (If question 1 is false) what could be used instead?

This question is a bit weird. You said that non-virtual methods are private, therefore you can not access them. That leaves only option to use virtual methods.

That means, create an instance of the mocked class, and pass it to object which is supposed to use it. The method is called dependency injection, and there are several ways to inject dependency.

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*Sigh, this is what I was afraid of. Thanks for example. This really came down to bad planning. I'm REALLY rusty with my c++ and I didn't think my testing through and I have created this problem when I could have made it so much easier had I just thought a head more to my testing. –  TWhite Aug 4 '14 at 15:19
    
what you mean by "Yes, it is, but you have to take care."? if all those non-virtual functions are public, then how to mock them? –  ratzily Jan 19 at 13:40
    
@ratzily You can't mock non-virtual methods. –  BЈовић Jan 19 at 13:45
    
but it is very normal that a class contains both virtual and non-virtual functions, in this case, it sounds like we can only test with non-virtual functions –  ratzily Jan 19 at 13:59
    
@ratzily In that case, you can reconsider your design or implementation. It is not possible to override a non-virtual method in a mock class. –  BЈовић Jan 19 at 14:03

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