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postgres 9.3.0, freebsd 9.1, python 2.7.6

I have 3 queries, here they are executing in sql from a file.

begin;
update public.tmp_configuration set data = '{"test": "this"}' where installation_id = 36;
update public.tmp_installation set last_pending_write = now() where id = 36;
update public.tmp_component set last_pending_write = now() where installation_id = 36;
commit;

I have shortened the data = update. The actual data is around 1MB and is contained by single quotes. Anyway, the script with 1MB of data runs in .12 seconds (fairly quickly).

I wrote a stored procedure in plpython2u. This procedure executes exectly the same 3 queries. It takes 3 minutes and 35 seconds to do so. If I run it with data = '{"test":"this"}' it runs in about .15 seconds. When the data gets to be 1MB that is where I see the stored procedure slow down. Here is that procedure.

create or replace function
cv_admin.aqs(wsid integer, a json)
 returns json
 LANGUAGE plpython2u
AS $function$
    import sys
    import json

    def disp(edict):
        return json.dumps(edict)

    args = {}
    try:
        args = json.loads(a)
    except:
        return disp({'e':'parse error','m':a,'t':'run'})

    q = args['query']

    try:
        with plpy.subtransaction():
            try:
                sp = plpy.prepare('update public.tmp_configuration set data = $2 where installation_id = $1',
                    [ "integer", "text" ])
                sv = plpy.execute(sp, [ args['installation_id'], args['data'] ])
                if sv.nrows() == 0:
                    return disp({'e':'tmp_configuration','m':'cannot update ','t':'run'})
            except plpy.SPIError, e:
                return disp({'e':'pgsql','m':e.sqlstate+','+e.message,'t':'run'})
            except Exception, e:
                return disp({'e':'exception','m':str(e),'t':'run'})
            except:
                return disp({'e':'other','m':str(sys.exc_info()[0]),'t':'run'})

            try:
                sp = plpy.prepare('update public.tmp_installation set last_pending_write = now() where id = $1',
                    [ "integer" ])
                sv = plpy.execute(sp, [ args['installation_id'] ])
                if sv.nrows() == 0:
                    return disp({'e':'tmp_installation','m':'cannot update ','t':'run'})
            except plpy.SPIError, e:
                return disp({'e':'pgsql','m':e.sqlstate+','+e.message,'t':'run'})
            except Exception, e:
                return disp({'e':'exception','m':str(e),'t':'run'})
            except:
                return disp({'e':'other','m':str(sys.exc_info()[0]),'t':'run'})

            try:
                sp = plpy.prepare('update public.tmp_component set last_pending_write = now() where installation_id = $1',
                    [ "integer" ])
                sv = plpy.execute(sp, [ args['installation_id'] ])
                if sv.nrows() == 0:
                    return disp({'e':'tmp_installation','m':'cannot update ','t':'run'})
            except plpy.SPIError, e:
                return disp({'e':'pgsql','m':e.sqlstate+','+e.message,'t':'run'})
            except Exception, e:
                return disp({'e':'exception','m':str(e),'t':'run'})
            except:
                return disp({'e':'other','m':str(sys.exc_info()[0]),'t':'run'})


            return disp({'result':'ok'})

    except:
        return disp({'error':'1'})
$function$;

I did have to hack it a bit, but, I think it gets the point across. So, when I call the procedure, I do something like this:

select * from cv_admin.aqs(1234, '{"installation_id": 36, "data": {"test": "this"}}'::json)

no problems when the data size is small, but when data gets to be 1MB, over 3 minutes to execute. I have tried it with and without transactions, no difference in execution time.

I printed out messages before and after each of the queries in the stored procedure. The first one is very fast. The next two each take 1.5 minutes. That's weird, because the next two are simple queries and they do not accept the large data argument, they are dealing with a timestamp and an integer.

I've tried vacuum full/analyze, reindexing system and database, etc. I've tried a variety of tuning parameters.

I am looking for a way to execute these queries in the python stored procedure without the performance hit!

I have found that if I do a pg_dump, then delete the database and recreate it from scratch, the performance is much better for the stored procedure (in the 2.7 seconds range, still not quick, but, not super slow either). This is a development database, so its schema is modified sometimes 10 times a day. It takes a few weeks before the performance craters like this.

Another thing I have found is if I disable triggers on the tables being updated the stored procedure runs in about 8 seconds (on the database where it takes 3.5 minutes to complete with triggers). But, as I said, dumping and reloading the problems go away. I have a sneaky suspicion that this has something to do with system tables / indices for triggers. My reindex system did not fix the problem, though.

share|improve this question
    
I this perhaps a dba administrator question? Should I move it to that list? Not even a comment, dang :-) –  Greg Aug 6 at 12:54

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