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TestTempB.h

#ifndef TESTTEMPB_H_
#define TESTTEMPB_H_
#include <string>
using namespace std;
namespace ddl_lib {

class TestTempB {
public:
    TestTempB();
    virtual ~TestTempB();
    template<class ... Args>
    void callCommandB(const string&, const uint32_t*, Args ...);
    template<class ... Args>
    void callCommandA(const string&, Args ...);
};

} /* namespace ddl_lib */

#endif /* TESTTEMPB_H_ */

TestTempB.cpp

#include "TestTempB.h"
#include "TestTempA.h"
#include "stdint.h"
#include <iostream>
namespace ddl_lib {

TestTempB::TestTempB() {
    // TODO Auto-generated constructor stub

}

TestTempB::~TestTempB() {
    // TODO Auto-generated destructor stub
}

template<class ... Args>
void TestTempB::callCommandB(const string& cmdName, const uint32_t* cmdSn, Args ... params) {
    cout << cmdName << endl;
}
template<class ... Args>
void TestTempB::callCommandA(const string& cmdName, Args ... params) {
    callCommandB(cmdName, NULL, params...);
}
} /* namespace ddl_lib */

main

#include <iostream>
#include "TestTempB.h"
using namespace std;
using namespace ddl_lib;

int main() {
    string aa="15615";
    bool ccc=false;
    TestTempB b;
    b.callCommandA("name", &aa, &ccc);//undefined reference to `void ddl_lib::TestTempB::callCommandA<std::string*, bool*>(std::string const&, std::string*, bool*)'
}

I'm using the variadic-template. Why the gcc can't deduced the real func? When the callCommandA and callCommandB in the main file,it works just fine.

#include <iostream>
#include "TestTempB.h"
using namespace std;
using namespace ddl_lib;
template<class ... Args>
void callCommandB(const string& cmdName, const uint32_t* cmdSn, Args ... params) {
    cout << cmdName << endl;
}
template<class ... Args>
void callCommandA(const string& cmdName, Args ... params) {
    callCommandB(cmdName, NULL, params...);
}
int main() {
    string aa = "15615";
    bool ccc = false;
    callCommandA("name", &aa, &ccc); //no erro
}

Why and how could I fix it? Thanks!!!

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marked as duplicate by 0x499602D2 Aug 2 at 4:04

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
Either use explicit instantiation or make the definitions visible to the translation units that use them. –  Captain Obvlious Aug 2 at 3:57
    
In other words, declare and implement the templates in the header files, not cpp. –  vsoftco Aug 2 at 3:59

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You CANNOT put template function into .cpp. you must put it into .h because compiler must know what the template is when specializing it.

your first main file

#include <iostream>
#include "TestTempB.h"
using namespace std;
using namespace ddl_lib;

int main() {
    string aa="15615";
    bool ccc=false;
    TestTempB b;
    b.callCommandA("name", &aa, &ccc);//undefined reference to `void ddl_lib::TestTempB::callCommandA<std::string*, bool*>(std::string const&, std::string*, bool*)'
}

is equal to

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
using namespace std;

namespace ddl_lib {

class TestTempB {
public:
    TestTempB();
    virtual ~TestTempB();
    template<class ... Args>
    void callCommandB(const string&, const uint32_t*, Args ...);
    template<class ... Args>
    void callCommandA(const string&, Args ...);
};

} /* namespace ddl_lib */
using namespace ddl_lib;

int main() {
    string aa="15615";
    bool ccc=false;
    TestTempB b;
    b.callCommandA("name", &aa, &ccc);//undefined reference to `void ddl_lib::TestTempB::callCommandA<std::string*, bool*>(std::string const&, std::string*, bool*)'
}

Now think as if you were the compiler. you're trying to compile b.callCommandA("name", &aa, &ccc). You have to specialize the template, but you do not know what it exactly is. To compile it, you have to know that, like this:

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
using namespace std;

namespace ddl_lib {

class TestTempB {
public:
    TestTempB();
    virtual ~TestTempB();
    template<class ... Args>
    void callCommandB(const string&, const uint32_t*, Args ...);
    template<class ... Args>
    void callCommandA(const string&, Args ...);
};

template<class ... Args>
void TestTempB::callCommandB(const string& cmdName, const uint32_t* cmdSn, Args ... params) {
    cout << cmdName << endl;
}
template<class ... Args>
void TestTempB::callCommandA(const string& cmdName, Args ... params) {
    callCommandB(cmdName, NULL, params...);
}

} /* namespace ddl_lib */
using namespace ddl_lib;

int main() {
    string aa="15615";
    bool ccc=false;
    TestTempB b;
    b.callCommandA("name", &aa, &ccc);//undefined reference to `void ddl_lib::TestTempB::callCommandA<std::string*, bool*>(std::string const&, std::string*, bool*)'
}

Now you do know what callCommandA is, then you can specialize and compile it.

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