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I have the following sample code:

#include <iostream>
#include <typeinfo>
#include <boost/fusion/include/adapt_struct.hpp>
#include <boost/fusion/algorithm.hpp>

namespace MySpace
{
  struct TwoMembers
  {
    int intMember;
    char charMember[3];
  };
}

BOOST_FUSION_ADAPT_STRUCT(
  MySpace::TwoMembers,
  (int, intMember)
  (char, charMember[3])
)

struct FusionMemberPrinter
{
  FusionMemberPrinter() {}

  template <typename U>
  void operator()(U& data) const {
    std::cout << typeid(U).name() << " " << sizeof(U) << std::endl;
  }
};

int main(int argc, char** argv) {
  MySpace::TwoMembers data;
  boost::fusion::for_each(data, FusionMemberPrinter());
  return 0;
}

At least with VS 2013 Update 2 this code outputs:

int 4
char 1

Why is the type of charMember not deduced as char[3] but as char? The operator() takes the argument as U&, so my expectation was that is get deduced as char[3].

Where is my mistake, btw. what do I have to change that char[3] gets deduced?

Many thanks in advance!

share|improve this question

The macro BOOST_FUSION_ADAPT_STRUCT takes a sequence of tuples consisting of (member_type, member_name). So in the case of your array, it's actually specified as a char in the type: (char, charMember[3]). It's unhappy chance that this actually compiles as the results are incorrect:

 //! Here's a snippet of the expanded macro:
 template< >
 struct access::struct_member< MySpace::TwoMembers, 1 >
 {
     //! Note the type is defined as char.
     typedef char attribute_type;
     typedef attribute_type type;
     template<typename Seq> 
     struct apply
     {
          //[...] 
          //! Note that the method to return the sequence member actually returns 
          //! a char 1 index past the end of the array.
          static type call(Seq& seq) { return seq.charMember[3]; }
     };
 };

Instead you might try using a boost::array<char, 3> instead.

#include <boost/array.hpp>

typedef boost::array<char, 3> char_array_3;
namespace MySpace
{
    struct TwoMembers
    {
        int intMember;
        char carray[3];
        char_array_3 charMember;
    };
}
BOOST_FUSION_ADAPT_STRUCT(
    MySpace::TwoMembers,
    (int, intMember)
    (char_array_3, charMember)
    )
share|improve this answer
    
Thank's Brandon for the reply! I worked during the weekend a bit further on the problem and I got it working with a definition of using char3 = char[3] and have this as a type in the struct. – Felix Petriconi Aug 4 '14 at 7:08

One solution I have found so far for myself is this:

using char3 = char[3];
namespace MySpace
{
  struct TwoMembers
  {
    int intMember;
    char3 charMember;
  };
}

Of course this only works withing C++11.

share|improve this answer

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