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I recently installed Homebrew and ran brew doctor. It looks like everything is OK, but I get what appears to be a very common message:

Warning: You have a curlrc flie
If you have trouble downloading packages with Homebrew, then maybe this is the problem? If the following command doesn't work, then try removing your curlrc: 
curl http://github.com

When I run it nothing happens:

me at my-computer-name in ~
    $ curl http://github.com
me at my-computer-name in ~

How do I remove my curlrc file, and what are the effects?

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1  
Unless you're having trouble downloading things with Homebrew, this message is not a problem and you do not need to take action. The doctor might have printed: "Please note that these warnings are just used to help the Homebrew maintainers with debugging if you file an issue. If everything you use Homebrew for is working fine: please don't worry and just ignore them. Thanks!" Please take this at face value. – Tim Smith Aug 2 '14 at 23:09
up vote 2 down vote accepted

The .curlrc file contains default command-line arguments (ie, they're included in your command without having to re type them) - so it's typically used to hold proxy information, etc. it's just plain text.

It's probably in your home directory, and/or $CURL_HOME . Note that it's .curlrc , not curlrc , so you'll need to use 'ls -a' to see it. Then it can be modified/renamed/deleted like any other file.

Can't say what the effects are of removing it - depends what's in it, but looks like it can't be worse than the nothing you're getting at the moment. Even so, to be safe, try renaming it rather than deleting it first.

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I should have looked at my home directory first thing. I twas trying to find it in spotlight and with find/grep. – u353 Aug 3 '14 at 16:53

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