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I have a coding challenge to reverse a an array with 5 elements in it. How would I do this without using the reverse method?

Code:

def reverse(array)
 array
end

p reverse(["a", 1, "apple", 8, 90])
share|improve this question
    
array.values_at( 4, 3, 2, 1, 0 ) –  Boris Stitnicky Aug 3 '14 at 0:06
2  
Could you clarify your question, please? In the question text you ask about reversing without using Array#reverse, but in the question title you are asking about reversing without using a loop (and yet you accepted an answer which uses a loop). –  Jörg W Mittag Aug 3 '14 at 3:45
    
If we have a collection, we need to loop or iterate. No escape. –  Arup Rakshit Aug 3 '14 at 4:06
    
So what do StackOverflow get for answering your coding challenge for you?! :-/ –  Pavling Aug 3 '14 at 11:04

6 Answers 6

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You can treat array as a stack and pop the elements from the end:

def reverse(array)
  rev = []
  rev << array.pop until array.empty?
  rev
end

or if you don't like modifying objects, use more functional-like reduce:

def reverse(array)
  array.reduce([]) {|acc, x| [x] + acc}
end

Cary mentioned in the comment about the performance. The functional approach might not be the fastest way, so if you really want to do it fast, create a buffor array and just add the items from the end to begin:

def reverse(array)
  reversed = Array.new(array.count)
  array.each_with_index do |item, index|
    reversed[-(index + 1)] = item
  end
  reversed
end
share|improve this answer
3  
The latter has the efficiency disadvantage of creating a new array for each x. If you look at acc.object_id you'll see it changes each iteration. –  Cary Swoveland Aug 3 '14 at 3:00
    
Yes, of course - this is a pure functional approach, without modifying any data, so the new object must be created every iteration. –  Grych Aug 3 '14 at 11:16

One thought :-

ary = ["a", 1, "apple", 8, 90]
ary.values_at(*(ary.size-1).downto(0))
# => [90, 8, "apple", 1, "a"]

ary.size.downto(0) gives #<Enumerator: ...>. And *#<Enumerator: ...> is just a Enumerable#to_a method call which splats the Enumerator to [4, 3, 2, 1, 0]. Finally, Array#values_at is working as documented.

share|improve this answer
    
Arup, is there a way to count downwards with the infamous for loop? –  Boris Stitnicky Aug 3 '14 at 3:49
    
@BorisStitnicky Fixnum#downto.. –  Arup Rakshit Aug 3 '14 at 3:50
    
@BorisStitnicky When you use for loop, it also call internally #each method. So you can't do with for loop. –  Arup Rakshit Aug 3 '14 at 3:54
    
I'd be thinking more about something like for x in [*4..0] do ... end, but that doesn't work. So I just wondered whether the infamous for loop can actually count downwards. –  Boris Stitnicky Aug 3 '14 at 3:54
    
That means the only way to perform something similar would be by using while / until loop and decrement by hand... –  Boris Stitnicky Aug 3 '14 at 3:55

Gentlemen, start your engines!

[Edit: added two method from @Grych and results for n = 8_000.]

@Grych, @ArupRakshit, @konsolebox and @JörgWMittag: please check that I've written your method(s) correctly.

Methods

def grych_reduce(array)
  array.reduce([]) {|acc, x| [x] + acc}
end

def grych_prebuild(array)
  reversed = Array.new(array.count)
  array.each_with_index do |item, index|
    reversed[-(index + 1)] = item
  end
  reversed
end

def arup(ary)
  ary.values_at(*(ary.size-1).downto(0))
end

def konsolebox(array)
  t = array.pop
  konsolebox(array) if array.length > 0
  array.unshift t
end    

def jorg_recurse(array)
  return array if array.size < 2
  reverse(array.drop(1)) + array.first(1)
end

def jorg_tail(array, accum=[])
  return accum if array.empty?
  reverse(array.drop(1), array.first(1) + accum)
end

def jorg_fold(array)
  array.reduce([]) {|accum, el| [el] + accum }
end

def jorg_loop(array)
  array.each_with_object([]) {|el, accum| accum.unshift(el) }
end

def cary_rotate(arr)
  arr.size.times.with_object([]) { |_,a| a << arr.rotate!(-1).first }
end

def cary_boring(arr)
  (arr.size-1).downto(0).with_object([]) { |i,a| a << arr[i] }
end

Benchmark

require 'benchmark'

arr = [*(1..n)]
puts "n = #{n}"    

Benchmark.bm(16) do |bm|
  bm.report('grych_reduce')    { grych_reduce(arr) }
  bm.report('grych_prebuild')  { grych_prebuild(arr) }
  bm.report('arup')            { arup(arr)  }
  bm.report('konsolebox')      { konsolebox(arr) }
  bm.report('jorg_recurse')    { jorg_recurse(arr) }
  bm.report('jorg_tail')       { jorg_tail(arr)  }
  bm.report('jorg_fold')       { jorg_fold(arr)  }
  bm.report('jorg_loop')       { jorg_loop(arr)  }
  bm.report('cary_rotate')     { cary_rotate(arr)  }
  bm.report('cary_boring')     { cary_boring(arr) }
  bm.report('grych_destructo') { grych_destructo(arr) }
end

Wednesday: warm-up (n = 8_000)

                       user     system      total        real
grych_reduce       0.060000   0.060000   0.120000 (  0.115510)
grych_prebuild     0.000000   0.000000   0.000000 (  0.001150)
arup               0.000000   0.000000   0.000000 (  0.000563)
konsolebox         0.000000   0.000000   0.000000 (  0.001581)
jorg_recurse       0.060000   0.040000   0.100000 (  0.096417)
jorg_tail          0.210000   0.070000   0.280000 (  0.282729)
jorg_fold          0.060000   0.080000   0.140000 (  0.138216)
jorg_loop          0.000000   0.000000   0.000000 (  0.001174)
cary_rotate        0.060000   0.000000   0.060000 (  0.056863)
cary_boring        0.000000   0.000000   0.000000 (  0.000961)
grych_destructo    0.000000   0.000000   0.000000 (  0.000524)

Thursday: trials #1 (n = 10_000)

                       user     system      total        real
grych_reduce       0.090000   0.080000   0.170000 (  0.163276)
grych_prebuild     0.000000   0.000000   0.000000 (  0.001500)
arup               0.000000   0.000000   0.000000 (  0.000706)
jorg_fold          0.080000   0.060000   0.140000 (  0.139656)
jorg_loop          0.000000   0.000000   0.000000 (  0.001388)
cary_rotate        0.090000   0.000000   0.090000 (  0.087327)
cary_boring        0.000000   0.000000   0.000000 (  0.001185)
grych_destructo    0.000000   0.000000   0.000000 (  0.000694)

konsolebox, jorg_recurse and jorg_tail eliminated (stack level too deep).

Friday: trials #2 (n = 50_000)

                       user     system      total        real
grych_reduce       2.430000   3.490000   5.920000 (  5.920393)
grych_prebuild     0.010000   0.000000   0.010000 (  0.007000)
arup               0.000000   0.000000   0.000000 (  0.003826)
jorg_fold          2.430000   3.590000   6.020000 (  6.026433)
jorg_loop          0.010000   0.010000   0.020000 (  0.008491)
cary_rotate        2.680000   0.000000   2.680000 (  2.686009)
cary_boring        0.010000   0.000000   0.010000 (  0.006122)
grych_destructo    0.000000   0.000000   0.000000 (  0.003288)

Saturday: qualifications (n = 200_000)

                       user     system      total        real
grych_reduce      43.720000  66.140000 109.860000 (109.901040)
grych_prebuild     0.030000   0.000000   0.030000 (  0.028287)
jorg_fold         43.700000  66.490000 110.190000 (110.252620)
jorg_loop          0.030000   0.010000   0.040000 (  0.030409)
cary_rotate       43.060000   0.050000  43.110000 ( 43.118151)
cary_boring        0.020000   0.000000   0.020000 (  0.024570)
grych_destructo    0.010000   0.000000   0.010000 (  0.013338)

arup_verse eliminated (stack level too deep); grych_reduce, jorg_fold and cary_rotate eliminated (uncompetitive).

Sunday: final (n = 10_000_000)

                       user     system      total        real
grych_prebuild     1.450000   0.020000   1.470000 (  1.478903)
jorg_loop          1.530000   0.040000   1.570000 (  1.649403)
cary_boring        1.250000   0.040000   1.290000 (  1.288357)
grych_destructo    0.640000   0.030000   0.670000 (  0.689819)
share|improve this answer
    
You hurt me at last! :-) –  Arup Rakshit Aug 3 '14 at 6:12
2  
One thing.. I learned today.. There is a limit to the number arguments of a method. –  Arup Rakshit Aug 3 '14 at 6:14
    
This is a great benchmark, thanks! Could you please add the method I just added to my answer (the one with each_with_index)? It should be quite fast I assume –  Grych Aug 3 '14 at 11:46
    
Yeah I expected it nevertheless recursion is the only method you can have if you don't want to use a loop :) –  konsolebox Aug 3 '14 at 12:36
    
I confirm my method. It's a nicely done report. +1 –  konsolebox Aug 4 '14 at 7:25

Here's another non-destructive approach:

arr = ["a", 1, "apple", 8, 90]

arr.size.times.with_object([]) { |_,a| a << arr.rotate!(-1).first }
  #=> [90, 8, "apple", 1, "a"]
arr
  #=> ["a", 1, "apple", 8, 90] 

Another would the most uninteresting method imaginable:

(arr.size-1).downto(0).with_object([]) { |i,a| a << arr[i] }
  #=> [90, 8, "apple", 1, "a"]
arr
  #=> ["a", 1, "apple", 8, 90]    
share|improve this answer

The obvious solution is to use recursion:

def reverse(array)
  return array if array.size < 2
  reverse(array.drop(1)) + array.first(1)
end

We can make this tail-recursive using the standard accumulator trick:

def reverse(array, accum=[])
  return accum if array.empty?
  reverse(array.drop(1), array.first(1) + accum)
end

But of course, tail recursion is isomorphic to looping.

We could use a fold:

def reverse(array)
  array.reduce([]) {|accum, el| [el] + accum }
end

But fold is equivalent to a loop.

def reverse(array)
  array.each_with_object([]) {|el, accum| accum.unshift(el) }
end

Really, each_with_object is an iterator and it is the side-effectful cousin of fold, so there's actually two reasons why this is equivalent to a loop.

share|improve this answer

Recursion indeed is the solution if you're not going to use a loop. while or until is still a loop, and using built-in methods not doing recursion may also still be using a loop internally.

#!/usr/bin/env ruby

a = [1, 2, 3]

def reverse(array)
  t = array.pop
  reverse(array) if array.length > 0
  array.unshift t
end

puts reverse(Array.new(a)).inspect # [3, 2, 1]

Update

Naturally recursion has limits since it depends on the stack but that's the best you can have if you don't want to use a loop. Following Cary Swoveland's post, this is the benchmark on 8500 elements:

                         user     system      total        real
@Grych               0.060000   0.010000   0.070000 (  0.073179)
@ArupRakshit         0.000000   0.000000   0.000000 (  0.000836)
@konsolebox          0.000000   0.000000   0.000000 (  0.001771)
@JörgWMittag recursion  0.050000   0.000000   0.050000 (  0.053475)
@Jörg        tail    0.210000   0.040000   0.250000 (  0.246849)
@Jörg        fold    0.040000   0.010000   0.050000 (  0.045788)
@Jörg        loop    0.000000   0.000000   0.000000 (  0.000924)
Cary         rotate  0.060000   0.000000   0.060000 (  0.059954)
Cary         boring  0.000000   0.000000   0.000000 (  0.001004)
share|improve this answer
    
You can have a different implementation. But you shouldn't override core methods. –  Arup Rakshit Aug 3 '14 at 5:06
    
@ArupRakshit Originally yes, but I thought I wouldn't want to define a method that doesn't explicitly say that it alters its argument's data. –  konsolebox Aug 3 '14 at 5:07
    
An obvious way is to create a new array instance within but that would complicate the recursion method with ifs. Another obvious method as well is to use a submethod like __reverse. –  konsolebox Aug 3 '14 at 5:10

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