Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I'd like to know if there is any way to prevent the use of trait methods out of any class context in PHP ?

Let me explain what I want with a short example, here is my current code :

// File : MyFunctions.php
trait MyFunctions {

    function hello_world() {
        echo 'Hello World !';
    }

}

// File : A.php
include 'MyFunctions.php';

class A {

    use MyFunctions;

}

// File : testTraits.php
include 'A.php';

hello_world(); // Call to undefined function -> OK, expected
A::hello_world(); // Hello World ! -> OK, expected
MyFunctions::hello_world(); // Hello World ! -> Maybe OK, but not expected, I'd like to prevent it

PHP manual page about traits is very comprehensive, and a lot of cases are treated, but not this one (http://php.net/manual/en/language.oop5.traits.php)

I desperatly tried to remove "static" and use "public", "protected", "private", but of course, it just didn't work. I've no other ideas so far, so maybe I'm missing something, or it's just impossible ?

share|improve this question
1  
I'd say it's impossible. – Charlotte Dunois Aug 3 '14 at 10:23
    
Why would one write a static function in a trait in the first place? – nietonfir Aug 3 '14 at 10:23
    
@nietonfir It was just a copy / paste from another piece of code for the example, nevermind. – Clément Malet Aug 3 '14 at 10:26
2  
This comment on the documentation page says that trait methods can always be called as if they were defined as static methods. – Barmar Aug 3 '14 at 10:47
1  
Can you make it private in the trait, then use use Trait { hello_world as public hello_world; } to make it public in ClassWithTrait? – Barmar Aug 3 '14 at 11:08
up vote 4 down vote accepted

Use the visibility changing feature when using a trait:

trait MyFunctions {

    private function _hello_world() {
        echo 'Hello World !';
    }

}

class A {

    use MyFunctions { _hello_world as public hello_world ;}
    ...
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1: beat me to it, was typing up the same thing :) – Elias Van Ootegem Aug 3 '14 at 11:23
    
@Barmar small typo use construct – LifeQuery Aug 3 '14 at 12:12
    
Thanks. FYI, for trivial typos, you can use the edit link instead of commenting. – Barmar Aug 3 '14 at 12:15

Using traits in PHP establishes the contract that functions defined in the trait can always be called as if they were defined as static methods.

If you really must, you can work around that behaviour dynamically by wrapping your function with a test that determines whether there is a match between magic constants __CLASS__ (the name of the class the trait is used in) and __TRAIT__ (the name of the trait itself).

If there is a match, then the method was not used as intended and you tweak its behaviour accordingly.

So your example would become:

trait MyFunctions {

    function hello_world() {
        if (__CLASS__ == __TRAIT__) {
            die('Sorry');
        }
        echo 'Hello World !';
    }

}
share|improve this answer
    
Working fine, but I think Barmar's answer is much more clear on what is the intent of the workaround and what is happening. Got my upvote though ! – Clément Malet Aug 3 '14 at 11:26
    
...and Barmar got mine ;) – Coox Aug 3 '14 at 11:31

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.