Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Does anyone have a good algorithm to calculate what date Good Friday falls on given the year as an input? Preferably in C#.

share|improve this question
2  
FYI, This is hard because Easter (and thereby Good Friday) is based on the moon, as was Passover before it. –  C. Ross Mar 24 '10 at 18:32
5  
@C.Ross: It is hard, hence why I asked :) –  Bryan Denny Mar 24 '10 at 18:37
    
Passover is still based on the moon; because the Hebrew calendar is lunar. Passover will always fall on the first full moon of spring. –  user122299 Mar 24 '10 at 19:12
1  
Duplicate of stackoverflow.com/questions/2192533/… . Despite the title, he explicitly says, "Actually, I'm really looking for the date of Good Friday". –  Matthew Flaschen Mar 24 '10 at 19:28
    
@MatthewFlaschen: Interesting, I didn't see that one before when I searched (but was searching against Good Friday, not Easter). –  Bryan Denny Mar 24 '10 at 19:51

9 Answers 9

up vote 25 down vote accepted

Here's a great article that should help you build your algorithm

http://www.codeproject.com/KB/datetime/christianholidays.aspx

Based on this example, you should be able to write:

DateTime goodFriday = EasterSunday(DateTime.Now.Year).AddDays(-2);

Full Example:

public static DateTime EasterSunday(int year)
{
    int day = 0;
    int month = 0;

    int g = year % 19;
    int c = year / 100;
    int h = (c - (int)(c / 4) - (int)((8 * c + 13) / 25) + 19 * g + 15) % 30;
    int i = h - (int)(h / 28) * (1 - (int)(h / 28) * (int)(29 / (h + 1)) * (int)((21 - g) / 11));

    day   = i - ((year + (int)(year / 4) + i + 2 - c + (int)(c / 4)) % 7) + 28;
    month = 3;

    if (day > 31)
    {
        month++;
        day -= 31;
    }

    return new DateTime(year, month, day);
}
share|improve this answer
1  
I don't know what you're referring to... j/k, I fixed it –  hunter Mar 24 '10 at 20:29
5  
You could refactor it to have meaningful variable names... –  Sarah Vessels Mar 24 '10 at 21:45
1  
@Hunter: yearMod19 is more informative than g! –  Sarah Vessels Mar 25 '10 at 3:04
1  
The last line 'return new DateTime(month, day, year);' seems to have the arguments in the wrong order. The DateTime constructor takes first year, then month, then day. –  rmac Nov 18 '11 at 12:51
1  
@rmac Corrected the last line that returns the DateTime. –  Contango Aug 1 '12 at 15:50

Don't Repeat Yourself

Think

Realize that calculating Easter is what you are really dependent upon.

Research

Here is the offical Naval Observatory page for calculating Easter.

http://aa.usno.navy.mil/faq/docs/easter.php

Execute

Use the formula for calculating Easter then shift to the previous Friday (or subtract 2 days, details up to you).

share|improve this answer

Wikipedia knows: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Good_Friday#Calculating_the_date

Good Friday is the Friday before Easter, which is calculated differently in Eastern Christianity and Western Christianity (see Computus for details). Easter falls on the first Sunday following the Paschal Full Moon, the full moon on or after 21 March, taken to be the date of the vernal equinox. The Western calculation uses the Gregorian calendar, while the Eastern calculation uses the Julian calendar, whose 21 March now corresponds to the Gregorian calendar's 3 April. The calculations for identifying the date of the full moon also differ. See Easter Dating Method (Astronomical Society of South Australia).

In Eastern Christianity, Easter can fall between March 22 and April 25 on Julian Calendar (thus between April 4 and May 8 in terms of the Gregorian calendar, during the period 1900 and 2099), so Good Friday can fall between March 20 and April 23, inclusive (or between April 2 and May 6 in terms of the Gregorian calendar). (See Easter.)

share|improve this answer
    
also see en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Computus (which may or may not be linked from that wikipedia entry). One method that has been used historically is table lookup -- don't discount this method (unless of course your question is for homework :-) –  Gordon Broom Mar 24 '10 at 18:34
    
Computus link is in there. –  Matt Ball Mar 24 '10 at 19:43

Try this:

// test code:
Console.WriteLine(CalcGoodFri(2008));
Console.WriteLine(CalcGoodFri(2009));
Console.WriteLine(CalcGoodFri(2010));

private static DateTime CalcGoodFri(int yr)
{
 //int yr = 2010;  // The year for which to determine the date of Good Friday.
 int a = yr % 19;      
 int b = yr / 100;     
 int c = yr % 100;   
 int d = b / 4;
 int e = b % 4;      
 int i = c / 4;
 int k = c % 4;
 int g = (8 * b + 13) / 25;
 int h = ((19 * a) + b - d - g + 15) % 30;
 int l = ((2 * e) + (2 * i) - k + 32 - h) % 7;
 int m = (a + (11*h) + (19*l)) / 433;
 int days_to_good_friday = h + l - (7*m) - 2;  
 int mo = (days_to_good_friday + 90) / 25;
 int da = (days_to_good_friday + (33 * mo) + 19) % 32;
 return new DateTime ( yr, mo, da) ;    // Returns the date of Good Friday
}

Logic ported from here: http://www.kenhamady.com/form25.shtml

share|improve this answer
3  
Its heartening to see that quality code like this never goes out of style. I especially like the use of meaningful variable names. Although, that said, I do wonder about the use of "days_to_good_friday" as a variable name, when "o" would have been more in keeping with the coding standards. Also, nice to see that "f" hasn't been used... which would allow the last three variables to be w, t and f. –  Black Light Sep 3 '13 at 13:10
    
@BlackLight: LOL! +1... Honestly, I tried a refactor on this but quickly gave up. The math is quirky enough that I would have been working for days to make basically an entire class with many a constant and private method to make this readable... The frequency of magic numbers per line of code may actually be a world record! (about 2:1) –  Paul Sasik Sep 3 '13 at 15:44

There's an online calculator here:

http://mb-soft.com/believe/txx/easter01.htm

It's written in pure javascript, and the script source is right there in the .html file. I'd mine it for algorithms and translate as appropriate.

share|improve this answer

It's not C# but you might want to have a look here.

share|improve this answer

A quick note to non-US coders trying out Hunter's code: for the last line you should use ISO constructor new DateTime(year, month, day); :)

share|improve this answer

Is it possible to the use the Hebrew or Arabic lunar calendars for the conversion? eg:

 DateTime getEasterSunday(int year)
        {
            const int fourTeen = 14;
            DateTime Paschal = new DateTime(1900, 3, 20);
            var iCal = new HebrewCalendar();
            DateTime eFullMoon;
            var pDate = new DateTime(year, Paschal.Month, Paschal.Day);
            var LunarYear = iCal.GetYear(pDate);
            var LunarMonth = iCal.GetMonth(pDate);
            var LunarDay = iCal.GetDayOfMonth(pDate);

            if (LunarDay >= fourTeen) LunarMonth++;

            eFullMoon = iCal.ToDateTime(LunarYear, LunarMonth, fourTeen, 0, 0, 0, 0);

            return Enumerable.Range(0, 6).Select(x => eFullMoon.Date.AddDays(x)).Where(x => x.DayOfWeek == DayOfWeek.Sunday).First();
        }
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.