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Scenario: the size of various files are stored in a database as bytes. What's the best way to format this size info to kilobytes, megabytes and gigabytes? For instance I have an MP3 that Ubuntu displays as "5.2 MB (5445632 bytes)". How would I display this on a web page as "5.2 MB" AND have files less than one megabyte display as KB and files one gigabyte and above display as GB?

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2  
I belive you should create a function doing this. Just divide number by 1024 and look at result. If its more then 1024 then divide again. – Ivan Nevostruev Mar 24 '10 at 18:37
9  
There should be a native function for this. – Sophivorus Feb 9 '13 at 5:03

17 Answers 17

up vote 163 down vote accepted
function formatBytes($bytes, $precision = 2) { 
    $units = array('B', 'KB', 'MB', 'GB', 'TB'); 

    $bytes = max($bytes, 0); 
    $pow = floor(($bytes ? log($bytes) : 0) / log(1024)); 
    $pow = min($pow, count($units) - 1); 

    // Uncomment one of the following alternatives
    // $bytes /= pow(1024, $pow);
    // $bytes /= (1 << (10 * $pow)); 

    return round($bytes, $precision) . ' ' . $units[$pow]; 
} 

(Taken from php.net, there are many other examples there, but I like this one best :-)

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4  
If you used $bytes /= (1 << (10 * $pow)) or the like, I could like it better. :-P – Chris Jester-Young Mar 24 '10 at 18:46
4  
There you go :D (personally, I don't like bitwise arithmetic, because it is hard to understand if you aren't used to it...) – Leo Mar 24 '10 at 18:50
3  
@Justin that's because 9287695 / 1024 / 1024 is indeed 8,857 :) – Mahn Sep 27 '12 at 20:26
6  
Actually, it's KiB, MiB, GiB and TiB since you are dividing by 1024. If you divided by 1000 it would be without the i. – Devator May 16 '13 at 19:41
1  
$bytes /= (1 << (10 * $pow)) does not work well but number above 1 TB – David Bélanger Aug 5 '13 at 16:40

This is Chris Jester-Young's implementation, cleanest I've ever seen, combined with php.net's and a precision argument.

function formatBytes($size, $precision = 2)
{
    $base = log($size, 1024);
    $suffixes = array('', 'k', 'M', 'G', 'T');   

    return round(pow(1024, $base - floor($base)), $precision) . $suffixes[floor($base)];
}

echo formatBytes(24962496);
// 23.81M

echo formatBytes(24962496, 0);
// 24M

echo formatBytes(24962496, 4);
// 23.8061M
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23  
+1 Nothing gets upvotes like a compliment. :-D – Chris Jester-Young Sep 20 '11 at 18:40
4  
it has 2 errors - add 1 to (at least small) files size - not working with 0 (return NAN) – maazza Aug 31 '12 at 10:35
    
Nice one. Is there a version of this the other way around? – Luke Jul 4 '13 at 0:43
1  
a lil dreaming : $suffixes = array('B', 'kB', 'MB', 'GB', 'TB', 'PB', 'EB', 'ZB', 'YB'); I wants a Yottabyte hard drive! :-P – SpYk3HH Dec 17 '13 at 16:49
    
i had to cast the $size to a double to get it to work. heres what worked for me: function formatBytes($size, $precision = 2){ $base = log(floatval($size)) / log(1024); $suffixes = array('', 'k', 'M', 'G', 'T'); return round(pow(1024, $base - floor($base)), $precision) . $suffixes[floor($base)]; } – c2theg Mar 19 '14 at 17:02

Pseudocode:

$base = log($size) / log(1024);
$suffix = array("", "k", "M", "G", "T")[floor($base)];
return pow(1024, $base - floor($base)) . $suffix;
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10  
This is just brilliant! Two upvotes?? Come on! – Vitaly Jan 25 '12 at 20:09

This is Kohana's implementation, you could use it:

public static function bytes($bytes, $force_unit = NULL, $format = NULL, $si = TRUE)
{
    // Format string
    $format = ($format === NULL) ? '%01.2f %s' : (string) $format;

    // IEC prefixes (binary)
    if ($si == FALSE OR strpos($force_unit, 'i') !== FALSE)
    {
        $units = array('B', 'KiB', 'MiB', 'GiB', 'TiB', 'PiB');
        $mod   = 1024;
    }
    // SI prefixes (decimal)
    else
    {
        $units = array('B', 'kB', 'MB', 'GB', 'TB', 'PB');
        $mod   = 1000;
    }

    // Determine unit to use
    if (($power = array_search((string) $force_unit, $units)) === FALSE)
    {
        $power = ($bytes > 0) ? floor(log($bytes, $mod)) : 0;
    }

    return sprintf($format, $bytes / pow($mod, $power), $units[$power]);
}
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Just divide it by 1024 for kb, 1024^2 for mb and 1024^3 for GB. As simple as that.

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use this function if you want a short code

bcdiv()

$size = 11485760;
echo bcdiv($size, 1048576, 0); // return: 10

echo bcdiv($size, 1048576, 2); // return: 10,9

echo bcdiv($size, 1048576, 2); // return: 10,95

echo bcdiv($size, 1048576, 3); // return: 10,953
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Just my alternative, short and clean:

/**
 * @param int $bytes Number of bytes (eg. 25907)
 * @param int $precision [optional] Number of digits after the decimal point (eg. 1)
 * @return string Value converted with unit (eg. 25.3KB)
 */
function formatBytes($bytes, $precision = 2) {
    $unit = ["B", "KB", "MB", "GB"];
    $exp = floor(log($bytes, 1024)) | 0;
    return round($bytes / (pow(1024, $exp)), $precision).$unit[$exp];
}

or, more stupid and efficent:

function formatBytes($bytes, $precision = 2) {
    if ($bytes > pow(1024,3)) return round($bytes / pow(1024,3), $precision)."GB";
    else if ($bytes > pow(1024,2)) return round($bytes / pow(1024,2), $precision)."MB";
    else if ($bytes > 1024) return round($bytes / 1024, $precision)."KB";
    else return ($bytes)."B";
}
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I know it's maybe a little late to answer this question but, more data is not going to kill someone. Here's a very fast function :

function format_filesize($B, $D=2){
    $S = 'BkMGTPEZY';
    $F = floor((strlen($B) - 1) / 3);
    return sprintf("%.{$D}f", $B/pow(1024, $F)).' '.@$S[$F].'B';
}
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1  
You get a double B (BB) for small values of $B, as a work around you could make "$S = 'kMGTPEZY'", and instead of "@$S[$F]" do "@$S[$F-1]". – camomileCase Jun 16 '14 at 16:29

Simple function

function formatBytes($size, $decimals = 0){
    $unit = array(
        '0' => 'Byte',
        '1' => 'KiB',
        '2' => 'MiB',
        '3' => 'GiB',
        '4' => 'TiB',
        '5' => 'PiB',
        '6' => 'EiB',
        '7' => 'ZiB',
        '8' => 'YiB'
    );

    for($i = 0; $size >= 1024 && $i <= count($unit); $i++){
        $size = $size/1024;
    }

    return round($size, $decimals).' '.$unit[$i];
}

echo formatBytes('1876144', 2);
//returns 1.79 MiB
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My approach

    function file_format_size($bytes, $decimals = 2) {
  $unit_list = array('B', 'KB', 'MB', 'GB', 'PB');

  if ($bytes == 0) {
    return $bytes . ' ' . $unit_list[0];
  }

  $unit_count = count($unit_list);
  for ($i = $unit_count - 1; $i >= 0; $i--) {
    $power = $i * 10;
    if (($bytes >> $power) >= 1)
      return round($bytes / (1 << $power), $decimals) . ' ' . $unit_list[$i];
  }
}
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function changeType($size, $type, $end){
    $arr = ['B', 'KB', 'MB', 'GB', 'TB'];
    $tSayi = array_search($type, $arr);
    $eSayi = array_search($end, $arr);
    $pow = $eSayi - $tSayi;
    return $size * pow(1024 * $pow) . ' ' . $end;
}

echo changeType(500, 'B', 'KB');
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1  
This does not provide an answer to the question. To critique or request clarification from an author, leave a comment below their post - you can always comment on your own posts, and once you have sufficient reputation you will be able to comment on any post. – Schemetrical May 30 '15 at 5:33
1  
Thank you for notice. – Kerem Çakır Jan 19 at 14:41

It's a little late but a slightly faster version of the accepted answer is below:

function formatBytes($bytes, $precision)
{
    $unit_list = array
    (
        'B',
        'KB',
        'MB',
        'GB',
        'TB',
    );

    $bytes = max($bytes, 0);
    $index = floor(log($bytes, 2) / 10);
    $index = min($index, count($unit_list) - 1);
    $bytes /= pow(1024, $index);

    return round($bytes, $precision) . ' ' . $unit_list[$index];
}

It's more efficient, due to performing a single log-2 operation instead of two log-e operations.

It's actually faster to do the more obvious solution below, however:

function formatBytes($bytes, $precision)
{
    $unit_list = array
    (
        'B',
        'KB',
        'MB',
        'GB',
        'TB',
    );

    $index_max = count($unit_list) - 1;
    $bytes = max($bytes, 0);

    for ($index = 0; $bytes >= 1024 && $index < $index_max; $index++)
    {
        $bytes /= 1024;
    }

    return round($bytes, $precision) . ' ' . $unit_list[$index];
}

This is because as the index is calculated at the same time as the value of the number of bytes in the appropriate unit. This cut the execution time by about 35% (a 55% speed increase).

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I succeeded with following function,

    function format_size($size) {
        $mod = 1024;
        $units = explode(' ','B KB MB GB TB PB');
        for ($i = 0; $size > $mod; $i++) {
            $size /= $mod;
        }
        return round($size, 2) . ' ' . $units[$i];
    }
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1  
Beware: K is for Kelvin and k is for kilos. – ZeWaren Dec 16 '13 at 17:57

try this ;)

function bytesToSize($bytes) {
                $sizes = ['Bytes', 'KB', 'MB', 'GB', 'TB'];
                if ($bytes == 0) return 'n/a';
                $i = intval(floor(log($bytes) / log(1024)));
                if ($i == 0) return $bytes . ' ' . $sizes[$i]; 
                return round(($bytes / pow(1024, $i)),1,PHP_ROUND_HALF_UP). ' ' . $sizes[$i];
            }
echo bytesToSize(10000050300);
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function byte_format($size) {
    $bytes = array( ' KB', ' MB', ' GB', ' TB' );
    foreach ($bytes as $val) {
        if (1024 <= $size) {
            $size = $size / 1024;
            continue;
        }
        break;
    }
    return round( $size, 1 ) . $val;
}
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Here is simplified implementation of the Drupal format_size function:

/**
 * Generates a string representation for the given byte count.
 *
 * @param $size
 *   A size in bytes.
 *
 * @return
 *   A string representation of the size.
 */
function format_size($size) {
  if ($size < 1024) {
    return $size . ' B';
  }
  else {
    $size = $size / 1024;
    $units = ['KB', 'MB', 'GB', 'TB'];
    foreach ($units as $unit) {
      if (round($size, 2) >= 1024) {
        $size = $size / 1024;
      }
      else {
        break;
      }
    }
    return round($size, 2) . ' ' . $unit;
  }
}
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<?
    function FileSizeConvert($bytes) {
        $bytes = floatval($bytes);
            $arBytes = array(
                0 => array(
                    "UNIT" => "TB",
                    "VALUE" => pow(1024, 4)
                ),
                1 => array(
                    "UNIT" => "GB",
                    "VALUE" => pow(1024, 3)
                ),
                2 => array(
                    "UNIT" => "MB",
                    "VALUE" => pow(1024, 2)
                ),
                3 => array(
                    "UNIT" => "KB",
                    "VALUE" => 1024
                ),
                4 => array(
                    "UNIT" => "B",
                    "VALUE" => 1
                ),
            );

        foreach($arBytes as $arItem)
        {
            if($bytes >= $arItem["VALUE"])
            {
                $result = $bytes / $arItem["VALUE"];
                $result = str_replace(".", "," , strval(round($result, 2)))." ".$arItem["UNIT"];
                break;
            }
        }
        return $result;
    }


echo "Result: ".FileSizeConvert(filesize("file.jpg"));
?>

PHP CODE by Mogilev Arseny

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