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I would like to create a class that does the following:

  • Its instance accepts a block.
  • During instance initialization, it executes certain actions, then calls the block, then executes more actions.
  • Within the block, another method from that class should be available.

Here is how i want it to work:

Foo.new do
  puts "Hell, I can get you a toe by 3 o'clock this afternoon..."
  bar
  puts "...with nail polish."
end

I have managed to achieve it with the following class:

class Foo

  def initialize(&block)

    puts "This represents a beginning action"

    instance_eval &block

    puts "This symbolizes an ending action"

  end

  def bar
    puts "I should be available within the block."
  end

end

As you see, i use the instance_eval trick. It enables using bar within the block.

It works fine, but the problem here is that instance_eval makes current local context unavailable. If i use it from within another class, i lose access to that class' methods. For example:

class Baz
  def initialize
    Foo.new do
      bar  # -> Works
      quux # -> Fails with "no such method"
    end
  end

  def quux
    puts "Quux"
  end
end

The question is: how do i allow executing bar within the block without losing access to quux?

The only way that comes to my newbie mind is passing bar as an argument into the block. But that requires more typing, so i would like to aviod that if possible.

share|improve this question
    
Upvote for The Big Lebowski reference... Nicely done. –  CDub Aug 3 at 16:23

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

instance_eval does not consider the scope of where the block is called, so every method call is only relative to what is defined inside Foo.

So you have 2 options. Either

def initialize
  baz = self
  Foo.new do
    bar  # -> Works
    baz.quux # -> Works
  end
end

or

def initialize
  puts "This represents a beginning action"
  yield self
  puts "This symbolizes an ending action"
end

....

def initialize
  Foo.new do |b|
    b.bar  # -> Works too
    quux # -> Works too
  end
end

I am not sure which one would be better performance wise, but the option you pick is based on your own preference.

share|improve this answer
    
Good, concise explanation. –  Cary Swoveland Aug 3 at 19:12
    
Thank you for you answer, Steven. With the first approach, my problem is this: gist.github.com/lolmaus/d5ae61584479e97aac16 The second approach does work! –  lolmaus - Andrey Mikhaylov Aug 4 at 9:13
1  
@lolmaus-AndreyMikhaylov The reason why you can't call bar inside the quux method is because you have already called quux from the Baz object, which means that self is no longer Foo. Your solution to that is by passing Foo as a parameter. –  Steven Aug 5 at 0:38

It works fine, but the problem here is that instance_eval makes current local context unavailable

instance_eval() does no such thing. The code inside all blocks, i.e something that looks like:

{ code here }

can see the variables that existed in the surrounding scope at the time the block was CREATED. A block cannot see the variables in the surrounding scope at the time the block is EXECUTED. In computer science jargon, a block is known as a closure because it 'closes over' the variables in the surrounding scope at the time it is created.

What instance_eval does do is assign a new value to the self variable that the block closed over. Here is an example:

puts self  #=>main
func = Proc.new {puts self}  
func.call  #=>main

class Dog
  def do_stuff(f)
    puts self
    f.call
  end
end

d = Dog.new
d.do_stuff(func) 

--output:--
#<Dog:0x000001019325b8>
main   #The block still sees self=main because self was equal to main when the block was created and nothing changed the value of that self variable

Now with instance_eval:

class Dog
  def do_stuff(f)
    puts self
    instance_eval &f
  end
end

d = Dog.new
d.do_stuff(func) 

--output:--
#<Dog:0x000001011425b0>
#<Dog:0x000001011425b0>  #instance_eval() changed the value of a variable called self that the block `closed over` at the time the block was created

You also need to realize that when you call a method and you don't specify a 'receiver', e.g.

quux()

...then ruby converts that line to:

self.quux()

So, it is important to know the value of the variable self. Examine this code:

class Dog
  def do_stuff(f)
    puts self  #Dog_instance
    instance_eval &f  #equivalent to self.instance_val &f, 
                      #which is equivalent to Dog_instance.instance_eval &f
  end
end

Because instance_eval() sets the value of the self variable inside the block to instance_eval()'s 'receiver', the value of self inside the block is set equal to a Dog_instance.

Examine your code here:

puts self #=> main

Foo.new do
  puts self  #=>main

  bar  #equivalent to self.bar--and self is not a Foo or Baz instance
       #so self cannot call methods in those classes  
end

Examine your code here:

class Foo
  def initialize(&block)
    instance_eval &block  #equivalent to self.instance_eval &block
  end
end

And inside Foo#initialize() self is equal to the new Foo instance. That means inside the block self is set equal to a Foo instance, and therefore if you write the following inside the block:

quux()

That is equivalent to:

self.quux()

which is equivalent to:

Foo_instance.quux()

which means quux() must be defined in Foo.

In this answer:

class Baz
  def initialize
    puts self  #=>Baz_instance

    baz = self

    Foo.new do
      bar  # -> Works
      baz.quux # -> Works
    end

  end

  def quux
    puts "Quux"
  end
end

b = Baz.new

...the bar and baz lines seem to have identical 'receivers':

   puts self  #=>Baz_instance

   baz = self  #To evaluate that assignment ruby has to replace the variable self 
               #with its current value, so this is equivalent to baz = Baz_instance
               #and baz no longer has any connection to a variable called self.

   Foo.new do
      bar  #=> equivalent to self.bar, which is equivalent to Baz_instance.bar
      baz.quux  #=> equivalent to Baz_instance.quux
    end

But when instance_eval() executes that block, which is everything between the do and end, instance_eval() changes the value of self:

   Foo.new do #instance_eval changes self inside the block so that self = Foo_instance
      bar  #=> equivalent to self.bar which is now equivalent to Foo_instance.bar
      baz.quux  #=> the block still sees baz = Baz_instance, so equivalent to Baz_instance.bar
    end
share|improve this answer
    
Very good explanation, VII. –  Cary Swoveland Aug 3 at 18:37
    
Thank you for the detailed explanation, 7stud. (nevermind, was wrong here) –  lolmaus - Andrey Mikhaylov Aug 4 at 8:58
    
    
@lolmaus-AndreyMikhaylov, That code does not produce the error you say it does; it produces the error: in 'initialize': uninitialized constant Baz::Foo (NameError) –  7stud Aug 4 at 16:12
    
@7stud, did you try to run it? It's a snippet, not fully functional code. I tried your approach on my project and failed. To explain the issue, i took your snippet (third from the end) and modified it to correspond to what i'm doing in my project. –  lolmaus - Andrey Mikhaylov Aug 4 at 17:52

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