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I was using msysgit and git-bash in cmder when I accidentally exited out of it.
Now I can't seem to figure out how to get to the unix environment I previously had.

Git bash is not recognized as a command.
All I see is the typical command window prompt displaying the C:/User/.. rather than the $~User.

How would you restore the git bash session?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You can type the full path of your msysgit intallation (2014, Git 1.9.z) to launch a bash session.

For instance:

  • "c:\prgs\git\PortableGit-1.9.0-preview20140217\Git Bash.vbs": will open a new windows
  • "c:\prgs\git\PortableGit-1.9.0-preview20140217\git-bash.bat": will open a bash session within the current shell.

Those two scripts aren't part of <msysgit/bin> folder, and are not found in %PATH%.

As commented by David Grayson and pred below in the comments, using Git-1.9.5-preview20141217.exe does result in an installation (in C:\Program File) which does not have git-bash.bat, and which rely on "Git Bash" shortcut calling C:\Git\bin\sh.exe --login -i.

Don't use that setup. Use the much easier and more complete package PortableGit-1.9.5-preview20141217.7z that you unzip anywhere you want and that you add to your PATH.

Note: with the new Git for Windows releases (2015, Git 2.y.z), that would be:

  • "c:\prgs\git\PortableGit-\git-bash.exe": will open a bash session within the current shell.
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That definitely worked. Thanks! –  Shroy Aug 3 '14 at 19:47
@Shroy Great! Welcome on Stack Overflow. –  VonC Aug 3 '14 at 19:48
Also note that cmder comes with msysgit, so you can use the cmder's root\vendor\msysgit\git-bash.bat –  Philip Nov 7 '14 at 21:41
Hm, I have git 1.9.5-preview20141217 and the batch file does not exist. The vbs file is there, but running it from cmder is useless because it opens a new Windows which is a normal shell, not cmder. –  David Grayson Mar 11 at 5:42
@DavidGrayson I have PortableGit-1.9.0-preview20140217 as well (unzipped from its archived version…), and git-bash.bat does exist. It is important to use it, as it will set %HOME% for you, as opposed to calling directly sh.exe (which isn't even the bash.exe) –  VonC Mar 11 at 7:33

An easy way to get this working is to define a custom "bash" task in Cmder, and then configure it to use this task by default.

  • Install cmder_mini (msysgit is already installed, so no need for full version)
  • In Cmder, open settings: Win + Alt + P
  • Under Startup > Tasks, add a task called {bash} with the following settings:
    • Task parameters - set the icon:
      • Either /icon "%CMDER_ROOT%\cmder.exe" (for Cmder icon) or /icon "C:\Program Files (x86)\Git\etc\git.ico" (for Git icon)
    • Commands - open Git's bash shell:
      • "C:\Program Files (x86)\Git\bin\sh.exe" -l -new_console:d:%USERPROFILE%
  • Under Startup, set startup options to Specified name task --> {bash}

...this will set Git bash as the default console in Cmder.

nb. The above obviously assumes that Git is installed in "C:\Program Files (x86)\Git" - if that's not the case, you'll need to change the path to point to wherever Git is installed.

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Exactly what I was looking for, thank you –  Kerry Jul 2 at 11:19

Run the following command in cmder:

sh -l

This assumes that Git's "sh" is on your PATH. But if you installed git differently and sh is not found, then try entering the full path to it, for example:

"C:\Program Files (x86)\Git\bin\sh.exe" -l

If you want to automate this so you don't have to run sh explicitly, then go into cmder/ConEmu's settings and change the {cmd} task to have the command sh -l and the parameters /dir "%HOME%". Then cmder will always start up Git Bash by default, instead of Microsoft's cmd shell.

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