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I have written a JSF2.2 web app running on Tomcat7. The app relies on the technique of using javascript to "click" on a hidden button in a form on the page to call a method in a backing bean.

This works perfectly in Firefox but fails completely in Chrome and behaves unpredictably and unreliably in IE (works sometimes if I click rapidly and repeatedly on the visible button on the page).

I stripped the code back to the minimum to try and diagnose the problem but I'm stumped. I'm sure I must be missing something as this is not exactly an obscure combination of technologies to fail so miserably.

Here's the tiny bit of code I'm analysing:

index.xhtml

<!DOCTYPE html>

<html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml"
    xmlns:h="http://java.sun.com/jsf/html"
    xmlns:f="http://java.sun.com/jsf/core">

<f:view contentType="text/html">
    <h:head>
        <meta charset="utf-8" />
        <title>JSF Browser Test</title>
        <script>
            function clickHiddenButton() {
                /* Trigger call to method in backing bean */
                document.getElementById('index_form:hiddenButton').click();
            }
        </script>
    </h:head>


    <h:body>
        <h:form id="index_form">

            <h:commandButton value="Call Bean Method"
                onclick="clickHiddenButton();" />
            <h:commandButton id="hiddenButton" type="submit"
                style="display: none;" action="#{bean.method}" />
        </h:form>

    </h:body>
</f:view>
</html>

BackingBean.java

import java.io.Serializable;

import javax.faces.bean.SessionScoped;
import javax.inject.Named;

@Named("bean")
@SessionScoped
public class BackingBean implements Serializable {

    private static final long serialVersionUID = 5443351151396868724L;

    public BackingBean() {
    }

    public static long getSerialversionuid() {
        return serialVersionUID;
    }

    public String method() {
        System.out.println("method called");
        return "secondPage";
    }


}

secondPage.xhtml

<!DOCTYPE html>

<html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml"
    xmlns:h="http://java.sun.com/jsf/html"
    xmlns:f="http://java.sun.com/jsf/core">

<f:view>
    <h:head>
        <meta charset="utf-8" />
        <title>Browser Test Second Page</title>
    </h:head>


    <h:body>
        <h1>Browser Test Second Page</h1>
    </h:body>
</f:view>
</html>

p.s. Current releases of all browsers

share|improve this question
    
Are you familiar with basic HTML? JSF is in the context of this particular "problem" merely a HTML code generator. You'd have had exactly the same problem when copypasting the JSF-generated HTML output into a plain .html file. Try nailing down and fixing the problem on basis of that HTML file. Once you get that to work, all you need to do on JSF side is just making sure that it generates exactly the desired HTML. In the future JSF-related questions, try to be more careful to not point the accusing finger to JSF too soon. More than often the "miserable fail" is just between keyboard and chair –  BalusC Aug 3 '14 at 21:02

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