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OK I love Python's zip() function. Use it all the time, it's brilliant. Every now and again I want to do the opposite of zip(), think "I used to know how to do that", then google python unzip, then remember that one uses this magical * to unzip a zipped list of tuples. Like this:

x = [1,2,3]
y = [4,5,6]
zipped = zip(x,y)
unzipped_x, unzipped_y = zip(*zipped)
unzipped_x
    Out[30]: (1, 2, 3)
unzipped_y
    Out[31]: (4, 5, 6)

What on earth is going on? What is that magical asterisk doing? Where else can it be applied and what other amazing awesome things in Python are so mysterious and hard to google?

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Duplicate: stackoverflow.com/questions/2233204/… –  Josh Lee Mar 24 '10 at 21:03
    
oh yeah. This is exactly the problem though, searching stackoverflow for zip(* python doesn't return the duplicate question on the first page, and googling for python * or python zip(* doesn't return much I guess because the (* is ignored? You're right though, someone else also thought this was awesome. Should I delete the question? –  Mike Dewar Mar 24 '10 at 22:01
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I wouldn’t delete it, since it ranks higher in search for some reason. Closing it would allow it to serve as a redirect. –  Josh Lee Mar 24 '10 at 22:07
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I found the link provided in my answer by searching "site:docs.python.org asterisk". The word "asterisk" is much easier for search engines than an actual asterisk character. :-) –  Daniel Stutzbach Mar 26 '10 at 0:56
    
"what other amazing awesome things in Python are so mysterious and hard to google?" Check out: stackoverflow.com/questions/101268/hidden-features-of-python for the answer :) –  Adam Parkin Feb 1 '12 at 23:58
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4 Answers

up vote 24 down vote accepted

The asterisk in Python is documented in the Python tutorial, under Unpacking Argument Lists.

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The asterisk performs apply (as it's known in Lisp and Scheme). Basically, it takes your list, and calls the function with that list's contents as arguments.

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Python2 series still has an apply function, but i don't think there are any use cases that can't be covered by *. I believe it has been removed from Python3 –  gnibbler Mar 24 '10 at 21:17
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@gnibbler: Confirmed. apply is listed at python.org/dev/peps/pep-0361 under the heading Warnings for features removed in Py3k: –  MatrixFrog Mar 24 '10 at 21:42
2  
Apply only exists because the asterisk was added later. –  DasIch Mar 27 '10 at 19:21
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It's also useful for multiple args:

def foo(*args):
  print args

foo(1, 2, 3) # (1, 2, 3)

# also legal
t = (1, 2, 3)
foo(*t) # (1, 2, 3)

And, you can use double asterisk for keyword arguments and dictionaries:

def foo(**kwargs):
   print kwargs

foo(a=1, b=2) # {'a': 1, 'b': 2}

# also legal
d = {"a": 1, "b": 2}
foo(**d) # {'a': 1, 'b': 2}

And of course, you can combine these:

def foo(*args, **kwargs):
   print args, kwargs

foo(1, 2, a=3, b=4) # (1, 2) {'a': 3, 'b': 4}

Pretty neat and useful stuff.

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It doesn't always work:

>>> x = []
>>> y = []
>>> zipped = zip(x, y)
>>> unzipped_x, unzipped_y = zip(*zipped)
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
ValueError: need more than 0 values to unpack

Oops! I think it needs a skull to scare it into working:

>>> unzipped_x, unzipped_y = zip(*zipped) or ([], [])
>>> unzipped_x
[]
>>> unzipped_y
[]

In python3 I think you need

>>> unzipped_x, unzipped_y = tuple(zip(*zipped)) or ([], [])

since zip now returns a generator function which is not False-y.

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