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Enclosed a screenshot of the Javascript console (Chrome Version 36.0.1985.125 m) after executing:

console.log(node)
console.log(node['read_cam0:x'])
console.log(node['label'])

enter image description here

Why is node["read_cam0:x"] undefined?

added issue at sigma.js: https://github.com/jacomyal/sigma.js/issues/361

UPDATE: Firefox console shows this: enter image description here

see the read_cam0 missing from the object on the left but displayed on the right (after clicking on object on the left side).

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3  
works perfectly for me: jsfiddle.net/9e7G7 –  Gerald Schneider Aug 4 '14 at 9:15
1  
The actual object in text form would be more helpful than a screenshot which doesn't show everything. –  Gerald Schneider Aug 4 '14 at 9:19
    
Can you please provide a full working example that demonstrates this problem? A live working demo would be ideal, but the exact code is equally acceptable –  musefan Aug 4 '14 at 9:24
    
Would really help to see what node is and how it is created/defined –  musefan Aug 4 '14 at 9:31
1  
@Risingson: the reason why the console shows it updated is because when you click the expand arrow it evaluates the current state of the object, not the state at the time of logging it. So by the time you expanded it then it had been updated. See this example. –  musefan Aug 5 '14 at 8:05

4 Answers 4

The expression obj["read_cam0:x"] works as you would expect and is not undefined.

The return value of console.log() is always undefined (therefore the second line in your screenshot). However, calling the function has the side-effect that it logs stuff to the console (the first line line in your screenshot).

Entering console.log in the Chrome dev-console (as opposed to executing it in a javascript file) thus always results in two lines:

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2  
Don't know why this got downvoted –  Dominic Tobias Aug 4 '14 at 9:16
2  
Because this doesn't address the question. The questioner does not care about console.log() returning undefined, but wants to know why it logs undefined in the console. –  Frédéric Hamidi Aug 4 '14 at 9:18
1  
Okay, now that the screenshot in the question has been updated I'm 100% sure. –  Frédéric Hamidi Aug 4 '14 at 9:33
1  
@FrédéricHamidi Good! Thanks for engaging in a discussion instead of just downvoting without commenting. –  mb21 Aug 4 '14 at 9:41
1  
better screenshot: i.imgur.com/EjTN0eS.png please also see code link comment of mine in question comments. –  Risingson Aug 4 '14 at 10:34
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Obviousely the chrome console shows the object in it's updated state while a line below it logs the state before the object was updated. The problem was identified by using a setTimeout.

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using setTimeout sounds like a bit of a hack. What if the update takes longer than the timeout? or what if the update is much faster than the timeout period, bit of a waste... at least you got to the bottom of the issue though which has been annoying me too! –  musefan Aug 5 '14 at 8:13
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that's why i used the word "identified" ;) –  Risingson Aug 5 '14 at 8:31

This just means the object you are trying to print to the console is undefined. The output would be [Object object] if it existed

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2  
console.log never outputs [Object object], unless you run console.log({}.toString()) –  Cerbrus Aug 4 '14 at 9:19

read_com0 is an object

Try this:

console.log(node)
console.log(node["read_cam0"]["x"])
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-1: There is no evidence to support your theory. In fact, there is plenty to disprove it –  musefan Aug 5 '14 at 8:11
    
Sure. This screenshot led me astray –  Livon Aug 5 '14 at 10:27

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