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I have a small C++ problem to which I don't know the best solution. I have two classes A and B as follows:

class A {
    int n;
    B* b;
public:
    A(int num): n(num) {
        b = new B[n];

        for (int i = 0; i < n; i++) {
            b[i].setRef(this);
        }
    }

    ~A() {
        delete [] b;
    }
};


class B {
    A* a;
public:
    B() { }

    B(A* aref) {
        a = aref;
    }

    void setRef(A* aref) {
        a = aref;
    }
};

I am creating an object of class A by passing to its constructor the number of objects of class B I want to be created. I want every object of class B to hold a pointer to the class A object that creates it. I think the best way to do this would be by passing the pointer to the class A object as a constructor argument to the class B object.

However, since I'm using the new operator, the no-args constructor for class B is called. As a result, the only solution I can see here is calling the setRef(A*) method for every object of class B after it has been constructed using the new operator.

Is there a better solution/design pattern that would be more applicable here? Would using placement new for class B be a better solution?

Thanks in advance for your help.

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2 Answers

1) Use a vector instead of memory managed memory. Use the following constructor of vector to create your B objects. This is a know limitation in native arrays:

A(std::size_t num): b_vec(num, B(this)), n(num) { }

Because you don't need deep copy constructor for B, the default one would work. Remember that there is no way to construct an array using a repeated copy of some value.

2) Use placement new, but thats just solving the wrong problem IMHO. Unless you need to call different constructors for different objects of your array.

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Thank you for your help! –  user301241 Mar 24 '10 at 22:07
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Is there a reason you can't use STL? Go with a std::vector if STL is fine.

e.g.

#include <vector>

class B { ... };

class A
{
  std::vector< B > b;

  A::A( int num )
   : b( num, B( this ) )
  {
  }

  ...
};

This creates a vector of B objects, initialising each one by calling the copy constructor. This has the added bonus of removing the need to calling delete[] too.

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