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For example, strlen() takes about 3*O(n). Why 3? I've wrote a really simple strlen-like function - it works much faster.

int string_len(char s[],int &l)
{ 
 for(l=0;s[l];l++);
return l;
}

Well, some of my friends says, nearly all of string.h algorithms are slower than they should be.

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closed as not constructive by casperOne Jun 7 '12 at 13:20

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3  
can you show proof that strlen was 3 times slower than yours? not that I doubt you, just interested –  hhafez Mar 24 '10 at 21:57
11  
"3*O(n)" doesn't mean anything. Also int &l is not valid C-syntax, it's C++. –  sepp2k Mar 24 '10 at 21:58
7  
A bit of trolling, perhaps? –  anon Mar 24 '10 at 22:01
4  
The libc impl does (on 32-bit) 4 times less memory queries and 4 times less jumps. Also on a 64-bit platform, the libc implementation is (about) 8 times faster than yours. –  Pindatjuh Mar 24 '10 at 22:19
4  
Stating that a library function is slower than your own, requires that you provide a concrete benchmark. Maybe the library function is slower in specific cases, but then your specific implementation is (consciousely or not) optimized for that single case. Benchmarking is a really complex topic. Your statement is like saying that a BMW 3 is much more powerful than any Truck (because it accelerates faster from 0 to 100kmh). But it ignores other aspects. –  Frunsi Mar 24 '10 at 22:35

6 Answers 6

up vote 14 down vote accepted

I seriously doubt that you have a faster implementation than glibc's version : http://sources.redhat.com/cgi-bin/cvsweb.cgi/libc/string/strlen.c?cvsroot=glibc&rev=1.1.2.1

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6  
Those are some heavy comments. –  Javier Badia Mar 24 '10 at 22:07
    
Although we cannot know without benchmarking it, it is theoretically possible that a simple version performs better for some very short strings, because of avoiding some tests. Of course, this ignores the fact that you would be testing against a hand-optimized assembly version, which is still less likely to be overcome. sources.redhat.com/cgi-bin/cvsweb.cgi/libc/sysdeps/x86_64/… –  jbcreix Mar 24 '10 at 23:14

I performed a quick test and your assertion was false

First custom strlen as described by you

  1 #include <string.h>
  2 
  3 
  4 int main(){
  5 int i=0;
  6 int j=0;
  7 
  8 char * my_string = "HHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHH";
  9 for(i=0; i< 10000000;i++) {
 10   for(j=0; my_string[j]; j++);
 11 }
 12 }
 13 
 14 

The results where

0.60s real     0.60s user     0.00s system

Now using the strlen from strings.h

   1 #include <string.h>
  2 
  3 
  4 int main(){
  5 int i=0;
  6 int j=0;
  7 
  8 char * my_string = "HHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHH";
  9 for(i=0; i< 10000000;i++) {
 10  strlen(my_string);
 11 }
 12 }

I get

   0.14s real     0.14s user     0.00s system

Which is 4 times faster

This is on i386 linux.

What platform are you on?

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3  
+1 for benchmarking. –  Javier Badia Mar 24 '10 at 22:14
    
how else are you going to know the performance unless you want to formally analyse the lib c code ;) –  hhafez Mar 24 '10 at 22:15

There's no such thing as 3*O(n) - the three in that is a constant factor, and asymptotic notation explicitly excludes all the constant factors.

So - back at you - why 3, where did you get this 3 from?

The standard strlen function in a typical compilers standard library will be written pretty much exactly the same as yours, and will probably have identical performance - unless your compiler has a hand-optimised machine code version, which is probably rare these days.

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I think he means 3*n comparisons or 3 times his algorithm –  hhafez Mar 24 '10 at 22:04

Library functions are generally faster. if not, they are more general than your functions. if not, they are more secure than your.

3O*(n) is a completely wrong expression.

I think all you need is a knowledge base of algorithm analysis, Asymptotic theory and Asymptotic analysis.

also this book will be helpful:

  • Thomas H. Cormen, Charles E. Leiserson, Ronald L. Rivest, and Clifford Stein. Introduction to Algorithms, Second Edition. MIT Press and McGraw-Hill, 2001. ISBN 0-262-03293-7.

you can find it in: McGraw-Hill - Introduction to algorithms or Amazon.com - Introduction to Algorithms, Third Edition

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3  
...if not, they are less work than writing your own. –  Jason Orendorff Mar 25 '10 at 12:39
    
give an example please :-) –  sorush-r Mar 29 '10 at 15:08
    
Take any library function you find. There is a 99% propability that it is an satisfactory example. –  Daniel Nov 11 '10 at 6:18

Reconsider your timing algorithm :-)

In some cases you may be able to write some code that is "faster" than a library function, but only if you cut corners that the library function does not. If you write code that has exactly the same behaviour as a library function, it is virtually guaranteed that your code will be equal at best, and probably slower, than the library function.

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Using platform specific assembly language may improve the performance, if the library doesn't already use platform specific assembly code. –  Thomas Matthews Mar 24 '10 at 22:39
    
If you use platform specific assembly language and the library function does not, then you are "cutting a corner" as I described. Of course, if you know something specific (that your strings are always fewer than 8 bytes long, or always followed in memory by a minimum of 4 zero bytes, or your code will always run on a specific processor, then you may be able to write a specialised function that out-performs a generic library function) –  Jason Williams Mar 25 '10 at 13:12

Hey It might be faster for very short strings (if you test was for a string with length 1 for example, but how does it perform with a variaty of string lengths including longer ones. If you look at the implementations for strlen in library code you see it tries to perform opreations on lonmgwords and not on separate bytes. Setting this up takes a few cycles and that is exactly what bites it for very short strings.

As to the general assumption: do you really think that you (and your friends) can do better than thousands of other programmers on all those functions in string.h??

Perhaps you can do better on your small testset for your computer in your controlled environment but the general case... I doubt it.

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