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If you run Anaconda on windows, you have an activate.bat file which concludes with this line to put your current conda env on the prompt:

set PROMPT=[%CONDA_DEFAULT_ENV%] $P$G

If you run cmder on windows, there is a nice lua script to customize your prompt:

function lambda_prompt_filter()
    clink.prompt.value = string.gsub(clink.prompt.value, "{lamb}", "λ")
end

clink.prompt.register_filter(lambda_prompt_filter, 40)

These two scripts do not play very nicely with each other. Clink has an API that seems like I could use to incorporate the change from activate.bat, but I cannot figure out how to call it from a batch file.

My overall goal is to merge these two prompts into the nicer Cmder-style. My thought is to create an environment variable, change activate.bat to check for the existence of the variable, and, if so, call the Clink API to change the prompt instead of set PROMPT. At that point I would think I could create a new filter to cleanly merge the value in. I can't figure out how to call the API from the batch file, though.

Other solutions welcome.

EDIT: Partial, non-working solution

require "os" -- added to top of file, rest in filter function
local sub = os.getenv("CONDA_DEFAULT_ENV")
if sub == nil then
    sub = ""
end
print(sub)
clink.prompt.value = string.gsub(clink.prompt.value, "{conda}", sub)

I added a {conda} in the prompt definition at the very beginning; removed the prompt statement from activate.bat, and added this to git_prompt_filter. Prior to using activate, everything is fine - the {conda} gets suppressed by the ''. However, if I use activate and switch into a folder with a git repo to trigger the change, I see:

{conda}C:\...

Does os.getenv not get user set variables? Don't know what else the problem would be. I also tried adding a print, it doesn't print out the contents of CONDA... either.

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1 Answer 1

Why not just delete the line from activate.bat and do all the logic in your cmder profile? CONDA_DEFAULT_ENV will be empty if no environment is active.

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I was anticipating deleting that line from activate, but was trying to figure out how I (instead) call the Clink API from the batch file to let it know to update the prompt. Are you suggesting to always cat in the CONDA_DEFAULT_ENV to the prompt? I had thought the lambda_prompt_filter() was only called once to setup the prompt, but looking at again, it probably is being called every time a prompt is displayed. Will investigate. –  schodge Aug 5 '14 at 20:21
    
Even if it isn't setup every time, you should hopefully be able to get the environment variable to be dereferenced every time. –  asmeurer Aug 6 '14 at 4:18
    
By the way, hopefully a future version of conda will use the changeps1 option on Windows like it does on OS X and Linux, allowing you to disable that line with a configuration setting. We don't have enough Windows experts to work on it to give it the love it deserves (but pull requests are welcome). –  asmeurer Aug 6 '14 at 4:21
    
I've gotten this almost working, but os.getenv() in Lua on windows doesn't seem to get user-specific variables. See above. –  schodge Oct 2 '14 at 1:37

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