Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

One of the questions I was asked was that I have a database table with following columns

pid - unique identifier
orderid - varchar(20)
documentid - int 
documentpath - varchar(250)
currentLocation - varchar(250)
newlocation - varchar(250)
status - varchar(15)

I have to write a c# app to move the files from currentlocation to newlocation and update status column as either 'SUCCESS' or 'FAILURE'.

This was my answer

  1. Create a List of all the records using linq

  2. Create a command object which would be perform moving files

  3. using foreach, invoke a delegate to move the files -

  4. use endinvoke to capture any exception and update the db accordingly

I was told that command pattern and delegate did not fit the bill here - i was aksed to think and implement a more favorable GoF pattern.

Not sure what they were looking for - In this day and age, do candidates keep a lot of info on head as one always has google to find any answer and come up with solution.

share|improve this question
9  
I frankly don't see how GoF patterns apply here at all. This sounds like a trivial 20-line program with a few subroutines using an ORM like Linq to SQL or EF, and no more than 50 lines in raw ADO.NET. – Aaronaught Mar 25 '10 at 2:19
2  
I'm with Aaronaught on this one, seems overly simple to demand a significant GoF pattern. If you are given a little more information, like the number of records you could expect in the database, you might be able to come up with some good decisions. The command + delete idea was a pretty admirable interview-style solution this this question if I may say so myself... – LorenVS Mar 25 '10 at 2:21
    
I used delegates, as I had no idea how many records were there and with delegates i could go with fire and forget routine – uno Mar 25 '10 at 2:22

I sort of agree with Aaronaught's comment above. For a problem like this, sometimes you can overthink it and try to do something more than you actually need to do.

That said, the one GoF pattern that came to mind was "Iterator." In your first statement, you said you would read all the records into a List. The one thing that could be problematic with that is if you had millions of these records. You'd probably want to process them in a more successive fashion, rather than reading the entire list into memory. The Iterator pattern would give you the ability to iterate over the list without having to know the underlying (database) storage/retrieval mechanism. The underlying implementation of the iterator could retrieve one, ten, or a hundred records at a time, and dole them out to the business logic upon request. This would provide some testing benefit as well, because you could test your other "business" logic using a different type of underlying storage (e.g. in-memory list), so that your unit tests would be independent from the database.

share|improve this answer
    
Andy: can you guide me to any sample that you think is worthy that would explain use of iterator pattern as you suggest? – uno Mar 25 '10 at 2:42
    
I don't know of a sample that I can point you too, but you could probably write up something yourself to try it out. Take a look at the "Iterator" article on Wikipedia, it has a few more simple examples on how an iterator is normally implemented, and you can extend it from there to have an underlying database lookup. – Andy White Mar 25 '10 at 2:48

A deep understanding of patterns is something you should definitely have as a developer - you shouldn't need to go to Google to determine which pattern to "use" because you won't have enough time to really understand that pattern between when you start reading about it and when you apply it.

Patterns are mostly about understanding forces and encapsulating variation. That is, forces create certain kinds of variation and we have well understood ways of encapsulating those kinds of variation. A "pattern" is a body of understanding about which forces lead to which kinds of variation and which methods of encapsulation best address those.

I have a friend who was teaching a course on patterns and it suddenly struck him that he could solve a given problem "using" (meaning "implementing the encapsulating technique of") every pattern in his course book. It really did a great job of helping drive home the fact that finding the right technique is more important that knowing how to apply a technique.

The Command pattern, for instance, starts with an understanding that sometimes we want to vary when something happens. In these cases, we want to decouple the decision of what to do from the decision of when to do it. In this example, I don't see any indication that when your command should be executed varies at all.

In fact, I don't really see anything that varies so there might not have been any patterns in the problem at all. If your interviewers were saying there were, then they may have some learning to do as well.

Anywho... I'd recommend Design Patterns Explained by Shalloway and Trott. You'll get a deeper understanding of what patterns are really for and how they help you do your job and, the next time they tell you that you are "using" the wrong pattern, you might just be in a position to educate them. That seems to go over pretty well for me... about 20% of the time. :)

share|improve this answer
    
Max: does your friend publish his slides? i found this: stackoverflow.com/questions/782690/… My thought about google was more to do with features etc, like trying to determine some lambda expression which someone else may already have solved and published on their blog – uno Mar 25 '10 at 2:39
    
This was all on a whiteboard. You are right that that silly technology questions are, well, silly. I was talking about the patterns part of your question. – MaxGuernseyIII Mar 25 '10 at 2:46
    
...but I'm always glad to discuss it in a more appropriate forum. Check out the Yahoo! LeanProgramming group; that would probably be a good place for an in-depth discussion about patterns. – MaxGuernseyIII Mar 25 '10 at 3:41

I would rather say that the interviewer wanted you to use (or mention) the SOLID object oriented design principles here, and in that process you might use some design pattern.

For instance, we could a make a design like below which adheres to SRP, OCP, and DIP.

internal interface IStatusRecordsToMove
{    
    List<IRecord> Records { get; }
}

internal interface IRecord
{
    string Status { get; set; }
}

internal interface IRecordsMover
{
    ITargetDb TargetDb { get; }
    void Move(IStatusRecordsToMove record);
}

internal interface ITargetDb
{
    void SaveAndUpdateStatus(IRecord record);
}

class ProcessTableRecordsToMove : IStatusRecordsToMove
{
    public List<IRecord> Records
    {
        get { throw new NotImplementedException(); }
    }
}

internal class ProcessRecordsMoverImpl : IRecordsMover
{
    #region IRecordsMover Members

    public ITargetDb TargetDb
    {
        get { throw new NotImplementedException(); }
    }

    public void Move(IStatusRecordsToMove recordsToMove)
    {
        foreach (IRecord item in recordsToMove.Records)
        {
            TargetDb.SaveAndUpdateStatus(item);
        }
    }

    #endregion
}

internal class TargetTableBDb : ITargetDb
{
    public void SaveAndUpdateStatus(IRecord record)
    {
        try
        {
            //some db object, save new record
            record.Status = "Success";
        }
        catch(ApplicationException)
        {
            record.Status = "Failed";
        }
        finally
        {
            //Update IRecord Status in Db
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.