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I've wrote a little autoit script,

#include <FileConstants.au3>
#include <MsgBoxConstants.au3>

Example()
Func Example()
    Local Const $sMessage = "Locate and click on a batch file."
    Local $sFileOpenDialog = FileOpenDialog($sMessage, @DesktopDir & "\", "Batch         files(*.bat; *.exe)", $FD_FILEMUSTEXIST + $FD_MULTISELECT)
    If @error Then
    MsgBox($MB_SYSTEMMODAL, "", "No file was selected.")
    FileChangeDir(@ScriptDir)
Else
    FileChangeDir(@ScriptDir)
    $sFileOpenDialog = StringReplace($sFileOpenDialog, "|", @CRLF)
    MsgBox($MB_SYSTEMMODAL, "", "Opening the file:" & @CRLF & $sFileOpenDialog, 2 )
    run("cmd.exe")
    sleep(500)
    send("cls && " & $sFileOpenDialog & "{enter}")
    EndIf
EndFunc   ;==>Example

esentially, you run this program, and a popup window shows up. It asks you to click a file that is either .bat or .exe. The program then runs that specific program in cmd.exe.

The purpose of this is to test and debug batch files. Here's what I mean. If you've ever made a batch file, and it crashes before you get a chance to read what the error is? This solves that.

Here's what I want to know: How can I make it, so when I right click a file that is either .bat or .exe, an option shows up that says "debug"?

once the user clicks this button, I just want the file directory to be set as a variable in a autoit script. I can handle it from there.

I just have no idea how I can modify the registry to execute an autoit script and setting a variable.

share|improve this question
    
cmd.exe /k c:\path\to\your\file.bat should do what your script does. You can add an option to the menu via the registry.. see here for examples. – Blorgbeard Aug 5 '14 at 1:54
    
That kinda puts my script to shame. – mikee Aug 5 '14 at 1:57
    
Lol sorry. Never mind, now you know about cmd /k. – Blorgbeard Aug 5 '14 at 2:01
    

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