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I want to print out a specific line of text base on user input. So far I have this:

list = open("/Users/nicejojo12/Desktop/Python/DictionaryDefinitions.txt")
listo = list.read()
nlines = 0
x = raw_input()
x.lower()
x.capitalize()
if listo.find(x) != -1:
    linesr = listo.index(x)
    defines = list.readlines(linesr)
    print defines
    print linesr
else:
print "Nope!"

But when I tried it out, the line number was wrong and it didn't print out anything. This gave no error or anything so I don't know what's wrong.

How do you make a program that opens and reads a specific line of text from a text file based on user input?

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1  
will you please provide some dummy content for DictionaryDefinations.txt and user input. Also explain expected result from input –  Lafada Aug 5 at 5:21
    
Provide a two or three lines of the .txt file as an exmple –  Nabin Aug 5 at 5:27

8 Answers 8

A more pythonic approach would be this:

search = raw_input().lower().capitalize()
with open("/Users/nicejojo12/Desktop/Python/DictionaryDefinitions.txt") as datafile:
    for line in datafile:
        if search in line:
            print line
            break
    else:
        print 'Line not found'
  1. Open the file with with so it will be closed automatically .
  2. Don't read the whole file into memory. Just iterate over the lines.
  3. Find the text with in
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First, don't use list as a variable name. You're shadowing the builtin function list.

data_file = open("/Users/nicejojo12/Desktop/Python/DictionaryDefinitions.txt")

Second, don't read the file with read(), read it with readlines() as you'd really prefer lines.

lines = data_file.readlines()
line_no = int(raw_input("Gimme a line number:"))
try:
    print lines[line_no]
except IndexError:
    print "Nope"
share|improve this answer
    
I'm not sure the user input is a line number. –  gnibbler Aug 5 at 5:29
    
Yeah, good point. –  stderr Aug 5 at 5:31

First problem: x.lower() and x.capitalize() do not change the string. There is no way to change a string in Python. You can only create new strings. x.lower() and x.capitalize() create new strings. If you want x to be a name for the new string, you need to do that yourself:

x = x.lower().capitalize()

Second problem: Once you have read in the entire file with listo = list.read(), you are at the end of the file. Attempting to read from the file again will not read any more, so defines = list.readlines(linesr) cannot read anything.

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       listo = list.read()

.After you do this.the list pointer to the file reached the end of file.So

       list.readlines() 

again will not work unless you do

       list.seek(0)

to bring the pointer at the start of file again.

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If you are giving text as input then the following way will be useful

list = open("/Users/nicejojo12/Desktop/Python/DictionaryDefinitions.txt")
listo = list.readlines()
nlines = 0
x = raw_input()
x.lower()
x.capitalize()
for sentences in listo:
    if x in sentences:
        print sentences
share|improve this answer

Here is a simple way to achieve what you desire (Assuming you want to print all the lines starting with the sting you provide as input):

datalist = open("/Users/nicejojo12/Desktop/Python/DictionaryDefinitions.txt")
listo = datalist.readlines()
nlines = 0
x = raw_input()
x = x.lower()
x = x.capitalize()
for y in list0:
    if y.startswith(x):
       print y

Here are some small things which you should have in mind:

  1. Do not set list as a variable name as it is a builtin function

  2. x.lower() or x.capitalize() doesn't change x. It just returns a modified version of the string. In order re-use the modified string, set it up as a variable and then use it.

  3. list.readlines(linesr) gives the the number of bytes that have to be read from the file and NOT the line at the index linesr

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list = open("/Users/nicejojo12/Desktop/Python/DictionaryDefinitions.txt")
listo = list.read()
lines = listo.split("\n")
nlines = 0
x = raw_input()
x.lower()
x.capitalize()
if len(lines)>int(x):
    defines = lines[int(x)-1]
    print x
    print defines
else:
    print "Nope!"

try this code.

First, it will print the line number that you enter from the shell,

after that it will print the specified line of the file.(e.g if x is 3, it will print the 3. line of the document)

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by the way your line number x should be integer. x.lower() and x.capitalize() methods are unnecessary. or I misunderstood your question :) –  Celik Aug 5 at 5:47

Never use built_in_ function names as variable names.

file_1 = open("/Users/nicejojo12/Desktop/Python/DictionaryDefinitions.txt.txt")
listo = file_1.readlines()
line_number = raw_input()
for lines in range(len(listo)):
    if int(line_number) == lines:
        print listo[lines]
    else:
        print "enter a line number between 1 to ", len(listo)
        break

If you're expecting line numbers as user_input, this will fetch you the respective line from file.

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