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I want to allocate my buffers according to memory available. Such that, when I do processing and memory usage goes up, but still remains in available memory limits. Is there a way to get available memory (I don't know will virtual or physical memory status will make any difference ?). Method has to be platform Independent as its going to be used on Windows, OS X, Linux and AIX. (And if possible then I would also like to allocate some of available memory for my application, someone it doesn't change during the execution).

Edit: I did it with configurable memory allocation. I understand it is not good idea, as most OS manage memory for us, but my application was an ETL framework (intended to be used on server, but was also being used on desktop as a plugin for Adobe indesign). So, I was running in to issue of because instead of using swap, windows would return bad alloc and other applications start to fail. And as I was taught to avoid crashes and so, was just trying to degrade gracefully.

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12  
There is no point in doing this. On all modern OS the memory used by one application does not affect the memory available for other applications as it is all virtual. Only allocate what you require. – Loki Astari Mar 25 '10 at 14:29
1  
@LokiAstari: false of course. a system has only so much it can allocate. I chose to have no swap files, so my system has 8GiB, after that, C++ calls to new throw bad_alloc and other application fails. In linux and recent windows there is an OOM Killer that will chose an app to kill. a virus could allocate lots of stuff in multiple process and use that fact to crash other applications. Not to mention, if you have a page file, the system will trash and freeze to unusability. (usually the WM only dies but on windows there is no Ctrl-Alt-F1) – v.oddou Nov 20 '14 at 7:26
1  
@v.oddou: None of that is relevant to the context of the question. Thus my comment stands. – Loki Astari Nov 20 '14 at 21:39
    
@v.oddou The Linux OOM killer would actually kill the imagenary virus pretty quickly; low uptime, low CPU usage, high memory usage, many child processes. This useless virus would basically be painting a big red cross on it's chest, and on it's children's. – YoYoYonnY May 28 at 14:03
    
@Loki Astari Not everyone is here for the same reason, and it's pretry useful to write a garbage collector which collects more often when low on memory. – YoYoYonnY May 28 at 14:05
up vote 9 down vote accepted

Having read through these answers I'm astonished that so many take the stance that OP's computer memory belongs to others. It's his computer and his memory to do with as he sees fit, even if it breaks other systems taking a claim it. It's an interesting question. On a more primitive system I had memavail() which would tell me this. Why shouldn't the OP take as much memory as he wants without upsetting other systems?

Here's a solution that allocates less than half the memory available, just to be kind. Output was:

Required FFFFFFFF

Required 7FFFFFFF

Required 3FFFFFFF

Memory size allocated = 1FFFFFFF

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

#define MINREQ      0xFFF   // arbitrary minimum

int main(void)
{
    unsigned int required = (unsigned int)-1; // adapt to native uint
    char *mem = NULL; 
    while (mem == NULL) {
        printf ("Required %X\n", required);
        mem = malloc (required);
        if ((required >>= 1) < MINREQ) {
            if (mem) free (mem);
            printf ("Cannot allocate enough memory\n");
            return (1);
        }
    }

    free (mem);
    mem = malloc (required);
    if (mem == NULL) {
        printf ("Cannot enough allocate memory\n");
        return (1);
    }
    printf ("Memory size allocated = %X\n", required);
    free (mem);
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
on linux you can use the binutils free command (or is it a bash command? maybe) you can launch using execve or system. A fun approach could also try to allocate (and write to 1) until failure to detect the memory available. not to mention checking speed so that swapping is detected. – v.oddou Nov 20 '14 at 7:29
1  
This is an extremely horrible solution. Imagine that you are working on a computer, and suddenly it starts swapping and slows down to a crawl, and some applications fail due to insufficient memory, and a network connection fails, etc. You panic that you have malware, shutdown or run antivirus, and find out that this was cause by some dumb application just constantly allocating and freeing humongous amounts of memory that it doesn't even need. – Michael Mar 25 at 16:13
    
@Michael I think I am inclined to agree with you, but then I would not develop code on a machine where anything running really mattered. – Weather Vane Mar 25 at 16:27
1  
Trying to malloc() and determine the available memory is a terrible approach to the solution of the question; far from being optimum and usable.... What stops you from using sysctl() family of functions and get some readings from OS tunables? Also, the concept of free memory changes from operating system to operating system, as, for instance, FreeBSD and, AFAIK OS X as well, considers unused memory as wasted and uses the memory for some useful stuff (answer to this is out of scope of this topic). Have a look at this freebsd.org/cgi/man.cgi?query=sysctl&sektion=3 – Fehmi Noyan ISI May 23 at 3:47
    
@FehmiNoyan I agree it is not very elegant, but Windows API does not have any sysctl family of functions (correct me if I am wrong). In the old days with Borland Turbo C there was memavail, but MSVC does not seem to have the equivalent. In another well-received answer GlobalMemoryStatusEx was suggested, but programs compiled with MSVC only allow the program about 2Gb of memory anyway. My system has 8Gb. How is that going to affect other programs? But if I need it, and other apps are stopping me from doing as I please, on my own PC, I will close them. – Weather Vane May 23 at 16:46

On UNIX-like operating systems, there is sysconf.

#include <unistd.h>

unsigned long long getTotalSystemMemory()
{
    long pages = sysconf(_SC_PHYS_PAGES);
    long page_size = sysconf(_SC_PAGE_SIZE);
    return pages * page_size;
}

On Windows, there is GlobalMemoryStatusEx:

#include <windows.h>

unsigned long long getTotalSystemMemory()
{
    MEMORYSTATUSEX status;
    status.dwLength = sizeof(status);
    GlobalMemoryStatusEx(&status);
    return status.ullTotalPhys;
}

So just do some fancy #ifdefs and you'll be good to go.

And so that I don't get marked down a ton...as others have said, you should not take up all the space available and there are probably better ways to do what you actually want to do. This technique doesn't actually get you the same definition of amount of memory, since some operating systems will use "pages" to mean whatever the hell they want (disk buffers, I/O devices). There is a huge disconnect between the memory space you have access to and the physical bytes in RAM (look up the translation lookaside buffer for just one example of this).

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I don't think you'll get downvoted for that since it is actually useful. We can suggest it's a bad idea as much as we like but, if someone really wants to do something foolish (though I hesitate to use that word), who are we to deny them the tools? – paxdiablo Mar 25 '10 at 6:56
3  
its not that i want to use up all the memory, its that i don't want to go and load too much data which i can't process with the available memory (i want to remain inside unused or some space which will not probably be accessed by other processes). Again, i don't want to be foolish to want to allocate all the available memory but want to decide what limit should i put on application so it doesn't suck up all memory and get crashed ~___~ – Wolfie Mar 25 '10 at 7:45
1  
For some operating systems sysctl may be a better alternative to sysconf. See man 3 sysctl. – Paul R Mar 25 '10 at 8:01
2  
This is useful for a tangentially related task I have: to warn the user when they're using a significant fraction of physical memory. I know I can use more and have virtual memory managed, but if I am using more than the amount of physical RAM I want to be able to warn the user, because this will result in a slow-down because of the resulting paging that will occur. – Chris Westin Oct 13 '11 at 21:06
2  
Minor nitpick: status.ullTotalPhys is an unsigned long long; if the method's return type is long then on some systems you'll get nonsensical results. Running the code as-is results in a return value of -729088 on my system, but changing it to match the type of ullTotalPhys results in the correct 21474107392. – Showtime Sep 26 '12 at 22:45

There are reasons to do want to do this in HPC for scientific software. (Not game, web, business or embedded software). Scientific software routinely go through terabytes of data to get through one computation (or run) (and run for hours or weeks) -- all of which cannot be stored in memory (and if one day you tell me a terabyte is standard for any PC or tablet or phone it will be the case that the scientific software will be expected to handle petabytes or more). The amount of memory can also dictate the kind of method/algorithm that makes sense. The user does not always want to decide the memory and method - he/she has other things to worry about. So the programmer should have a good idea of what is available (4Gb or 8Gb or 64Gb or thereabouts these days) to decide whether a method will automatically work or a more laborious method is to be chosen. Disk is used but memory is preferable. And users of such software are not encouraged to be doing too many things on their computer when running such software -- in fact, they often use dedicated machines/servers.

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It was not exactly scientific software, rater I was than building an ETL framework, off course it was intended to run on dedicated servers. Probably, it needed to ave a maximum allowed memory like, Java or Maltab takes as start-up parameter. – Wolfie Sep 20 '14 at 14:29
    
There are reasons to do this with rendering software at least. You want to use as much memory as you have. for example: the physical memory available (×α with 0.5<α<0.8) will be the limit for the photon map size. + some min(physi, 2GiB) to avoid that machines with 256GB of RAM takes forever to build the photonmap. but still. You can also imagine roaming in games, I have seen engines streaming IN and OUT assets to maintain a memory target. the more memory you have the farther you can see. – v.oddou Nov 20 '14 at 7:36

There is no platform independent way to do this, different operating systems use different memory management strategies.

These other stack overflow questions will help:

You should watch out though: It is notoriously difficult to get a "real" value for available memory in linux. What the operating system displays as used by a process is no guarantee of what is actually allocated for the process.

This is a common issue when developing embedded linux systems such as routers, where you want to buffer as much as the hardware allows. Here is a link to an example showing how to get this information in a linux (in C):

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linux uses lazy allocation, you can guarantee the memory is allocated by writing in it. – v.oddou Nov 20 '14 at 7:37

Mac OS X example using sysctl (man 3 sysctl):

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdint.h>
#include <sys/types.h>
#include <sys/sysctl.h>

int main(void)
{
    int mib[2] = { CTL_HW, HW_MEMSIZE };
    u_int namelen = sizeof(mib) / sizeof(mib[0]);
    uint64_t size;
    size_t len = sizeof(size);

    if (sysctl(mib, namelen, &size, &len, NULL, 0) < 0)
    {
        perror("sysctl");
    }
    else
    {
        printf("HW.HW_MEMSIZE = %llu bytes\n", size);
    }
    return 0;
}

(may also work on other BSD-like operating systems ?)

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3  
This returns total physical memory in the system, not available (free) memory. – Violet Giraffe Dec 26 '13 at 14:03

The "official" function for this is std::get_temporary_buffer(). However, you might want to test whether your platform has a decent implemenation. I understand that not all platforms behave as desired.

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Instead of trying to guess, have you considered letting the user configure how much memory to use for buffers, as well as assuming somewhat conservative defaults? This way you can still run (possibly slightly slower) with no override, but if the user know there is X memory available for the app they can improve performance by configuring that amount.

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The code below gives the total and free memory in Megabytes. Works for FreeBSD, but you should be able to use same/similar sysctl tunables on your platform and do to the same thing (Linux & OS X have sysctl at least)

#include <stdio.h>
#include <errno.h>

#include <sys/types.h>
#include <sys/sysctl.h>
#include <sys/vmmeter.h>

int main(){
    int rc;
    u_int page_size;
    struct vmtotal vmt;
    size_t vmt_size, uint_size; 

    vmt_size = sizeof(vmt);
    uint_size = sizeof(page_size);

    rc = sysctlbyname("vm.vmtotal", &vmt, &vmt_size, NULL, 0);
    if (rc < 0){
       perror("sysctlbyname");
       return 1;
    }

    rc = sysctlbyname("vm.stats.vm.v_page_size", &page_size, &uint_size, NULL, 0);
    if (rc < 0){
       perror("sysctlbyname");
       return 1;
    }

    printf("Free memory       : %ld\n", vmt.t_free * (u_int64_t)page_size);
    printf("Available memory  : %ld\n", vmt.t_avm * (u_int64_t)page_size);

    return 0;
}

Below is the output of the program, compared with the vmstat(8) output on my system.

~/code/memstats % cc memstats.c 
~/code/memstats % ./a.out 
Free memory       : 5481914368
Available memory  : 8473378816
~/code/memstats % vmstat 
 procs      memory      page                    disks     faults         cpu
 r b w     avm    fre   flt  re  pi  po    fr  sr ad0 ad1   in   sy   cs us sy id
 0 0 0   8093M  5228M   287   0   1   0   304 133   0   0  112 9597 1652  2  1 97
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There is no standard way to achieve this in C++ and, actually, you probably shouldn't do that. The amount of memory you grab should be dictated by the work you're doing rather than the amount you have available to you.

The main reason for not doing it is to play nice. Yours is rarely the only process running on the box and, if you try to allocate as much as possible, you may have an adverse effect on other processes.

Applications should be designed to only allocate what they need, when they need it, and to fail gracefully if the OS decides they've already got too much. By all means, allocate a big chunk (as needed) at the start if you wish, but don't try to figure out how much it should be based on the memory available.

In any case, there is a disconnect between address space and physical memory in modern operating systems. You can allocate far more memory than physically exists and the OS will generally take care of it for you, swapping bits out to secondary storage as required.

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8  
Not an answer to the question. We don't know his situation, he could have good reasons for doing it. Maybe it is the only app on the box, maybe he is changing an SQL or an app on a single purpose embedded machine. – Sqeaky Jul 19 '13 at 4:10
    
@Sqeaky: no, we don't know his situation, which means maybe he shouldn't be doing it. There's ample precedent on SO for answering questions asking how to do X with "X can be a really bad idea", such as writing your OS in COBOL, or an accounting package in Lisp, or just about anything in Pascal :-) You may want to take note that the top-voted answer also advocates that this is a bad idea. – paxdiablo Jul 19 '13 at 5:03
3  
I did not mean to start a debate, I just see answers that advocate "Best Practices" instead of actually answering the question too often. Sometimes "Best Practices" just don't matter and answers to the questions are important. – Sqeaky Jul 19 '13 at 11:42
1  
This does not provide an answer to the question. To critique or request clarification from an author, leave a comment below their post. – gha.st Jan 29 '15 at 15:59
1  
This is not an answer to the question, and ignores the fact that applications exist where you should or must know how much memory is available, such as when working on dedicated systems with large data. – MVTC Jun 10 at 3:56

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