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I would like to use JS to convert a nested exponential LaTeX expression such as

2^{3^{4^5}}

to PHP's pow() syntax

pow(2,pow(3,pow(4,5)))

I know JS doesn't support recursive RegExp. The expression is part of an equation, so I expect the solution to work with something like

\frac{3}{9}+\frac{2^{\sqrt{4^2}}}{6}

which should output

\frac{3}{9}+\frac{pow(2,\sqrt{pow(4,2)})}{6} 

like in @AbcAeffchen's solution.

I don't need conversion for the non-exponential parts.

Notice: The solution must not require resorting to PHP 5.6, which introduced the ** operator

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try this regex101.com/r/vL4kQ1/2, not perfect, also require looping –  pushpraj Aug 12 '14 at 10:27
1  
Please provide examples of possible inputs and their respective outputs. The 1 example you give is invalid. –  tcooc Aug 12 '14 at 22:53
    
If you mean the parentheses instead of curly braces, it is just for convenience. I have replaced with curly braces, Also added the desired output based on @AbcAeffchen solution –  Matanya Aug 13 '14 at 4:59

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted
+100

Try this function I wrote. It just uses ordinary string functions, so it is a little bit longer.
Basically it works as the following

  • find the first occurrence of ^
  • find the part before ^ that belongs to the basis
  • find the part after ^ that belongs to the exponent
  • call the function recursive on the exponent and on the part after the exponent
  • put all parts together.

and so it looks in javascript (test it here)

function convertLatexPow(str)
{
    // contains no pow
    var posOfPow = str.indexOf('^');
    if(posOfPow == -1)
        return str;

    var head = str.substr(0,posOfPow);
    var tail = str.substr(posOfPow+1);

    // find the beginning of pow
    var headLen = posOfPow;
    var beginning = 0;
    var counter;
    if(head[headLen-1] == '}')      // find the opening brace
    {
        counter = 1;
        for(i = headLen-2; i >= 0; i--)
        {
            if(head[i] == '}')
                counter++;
            else if(head[i] == '{')
                counter--;

            if(counter == 0)
            {
                beginning = i;
                break;
            }
        }
    }
    else if(head[headLen-1].match('[0-9]{1}'))  // find the beginning of the number
    {
        for(i = headLen-2; i >= 0; i--)
        {
            if(!head[i].match('[0-9]{1}'))
            {
                beginning = i+1;
                break;
            }
        }
    }
    else    // the string looks like ...abc^{..}.. so the basis is only one character ('c' in this case)
        beginning = headLen-1;

    var untouchedHead = head.substr(0,beginning);

    var firstArg = head.substr(beginning);
    // find the end of pow
    var secondArg, untouchedTail;
    if(tail[0] != '{')
    {
        secondArg = tail[0];
        untouchedTail = tail.substr(1);
    }
    else
    {
        counter = 1;
        var len = tail.length;
        var end = len+1;
        for(i = 1; i < len; i++)
        {
            if(tail[i] == '{')
                counter++;
            else if(tail[i] == '}')
                counter--;

            if(counter == 0)
            {
                end = i;
                break;
            }
        }
        secondArg = tail.substr(1,end-1);
        if(end < len-1)
            untouchedTail = tail.substr(end+1);
        else
            untouchedTail = '';
    }

    return untouchedHead
        + 'pow(' + firstArg + ',' + convertLatexPow(secondArg) + ')'
        + convertLatexPow(untouchedTail);
}

Input: '2^{3^{4^5}}'
Output: pow(2,pow(3,pow(4,5)))

Input: '\\frac{3}{9}+\\frac{2^{\\sqrt{4^2}}}{6}'
Output: \frac{3}{9}+\frac{pow(2,\sqrt{pow(4,2)})}{6}

Input: '{a + 2 \\cdot (b + c)}^2'
Output: pow({a + 2 \cdot (b + c)},2)

Notice: It do not parse the \sqrt. you have to do this extra.

Feel free to improve it :)

Notice: ^ in LaTeX does not mean power. It just means superscript. So 2^3 becomes 23 (and looks like "2 to the power of 3"), but \sum_{i=1}^n just becomes better formatted. But you can extend the function above to ignore ^ directly after }.

Notice: As Lucas Trzesniewski mentioned in the comment, 2^3^4 is not converted "correct", but it is also not a valid LaTeX expression.

Edit: Improved the function to convert '{a + 2 \\cdot (b + c)}^2' right.

Notice: In LaTeX exists many ways to write a brace (e.g. (, \left(, [, \lbrace,..). To be sure this function works fine with all this braces you should convert all that braces to { and } first. Or to normal braces (, but then the function has to be edited to look for ( instead of {.

Notice: The complexity of this function is O(n⋅k), where n is the length of the input and k is the number of ^ in the input. An worst case input would be the first test case 2^{3^{4^{...}}}. But in most cases the function will be much faster. Something about O(n).

share|improve this answer
    
convertLatexPow("a^b^c") outputs pow(a,b)pow(,c). I guess the expected output is pow(a, pow(b, c)) as ^ should be right-associative. –  Lucas Trzesniewski Aug 12 '14 at 18:01
    
I know this issue, but it is not valid latex code, so i ignored it –  AbcAeffchen Aug 12 '14 at 18:26
1  
Ok, I don't know latex so sorry about that. +1 for the non-regex solution then, as it's impossible to get this right with JavaScript regex syntax (ie. without recursion or balancing groups). –  Lucas Trzesniewski Aug 12 '14 at 21:38
    
No problem, I added a notice to my answer –  AbcAeffchen Aug 12 '14 at 22:56

An ugly hack,

> foo
'2,(3^(4^5))'
> var foo = "2^(3^(4^5))".replace(/\^/g, ",");
undefined
> foo
'2,(3,(4,5))'
> var bar = foo.replace(/(\d,)(?=[^\d])/g, "$1pow");
undefined
> var foobar = bar.replace(/^(.*)$/, "pow($1)")
undefined
> foobar
'pow(2,pow(3,pow(4,5)))'
share|improve this answer
1  
It works on an isolated expression, but not on a whole equation where the exponential expression is embedded, e.g. \frac{3}{9}+\frac{2^{\sqrt{4^2}}}{6} –  Matanya Aug 7 '14 at 9:57
1  
@Avinash gave you what you asked for, what you said requires a complete converter from all latex commands to php functions –  Issam Zoli Aug 11 '14 at 13:57
    
@Matanya Do you expect \frac{3}{9}+\frac{2^{\sqrt{4^2}}}{6} to be frac(3,9)+frac(pow(2,sqrt(pow(4,2))),6) ? [functions mapping needs to be defined by you] –  Issam Zoli Aug 11 '14 at 14:02
    
I am NOT looking for a complete converter. Only interested in the exponential expression. The downside to @AvinashRaj solution is that it only works on isolated exponential expression, thus my example, which yields using the aforementioned solution pow(\frac{3}{9}+\frac{2,pow{\sqrt{4,2}}}{6}) –  Matanya Aug 12 '14 at 15:13

You can do it iteratively:

var foo = "2^(3^(4^5))";
while (/\([^^]+\^[^^]+\)/.test(foo)) {
  foo = foo.replace(/\(([^^]+)\^([^^]+)\)/, "pow($1,$2)");
}
if (/(.+)\^(.+)/.test(foo)) {
  foo = "pow(" + RegExp.$1 + "," + RegExp.$2 + ")";
}
# foo == "pow(2,pow(3,pow(4,5)))"
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