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I have a Apache Camel context which is part of a large Spring application. The application has a web based admin UI. I'd like to be able to stop/start/suspend/resume the camel routes from within this UI. How can I achieve this?

Currently my Camel context is defined in a Spring context file and autostarts when the Spring application is deployed. My routes are defined in Java classes which extend SpringRouteBuilder.

I have:

camel-context.xml:

<beans>

    <!--bootstrap camel context-->
    <camelContext xmlns="http://camel.apache.org/schema/spring">
        <package>com.package</package>
    </camelContext>

</beans>

which is imported in the main Spring context. I then have classes which extend SpringRouteBuilder in com.package

Is there a better way of doing this so that I can programatically control the Camel context when there is an event in the UI?

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Is the problem that you do not have access to the camel context in your code? Otherwise the camel context has methods to get the routes, as well as stop and start them. You could also use the camel JMX interface to do the same. –  kharyam Aug 5 '14 at 10:16
    
Yes, I do not have access to the Camel context. –  mip Aug 5 '14 at 10:19
    
I'm considering using OnCompletion and writing a Processor which checks a database field and calls stop on the on the Camel context if necessary. Any opinions on this approach? –  mip Aug 5 '14 at 12:52
    
Look at the camel JMX methods. This will allow you to call stop directly on the routes etc. –  Namphibian Aug 6 '14 at 21:14
    
I've realised that the Camel context is just a bean that can be autowired and used as required. See camel.465427.n5.nabble.com/… –  mip Aug 7 '14 at 12:21

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can also do like we do in hawtio (http://hawt.io/) where we use REST calls to remote manage Camel applications, so we can control routes, see statistic, view routes, and much more. All this is made easier by using an excellent library called jolokia (http://jolokia.org/) that makes JMX exposed as REST services. Each JMX operation/attribute is easily callable as an URI template over REST. And data is in json format.

That what you can build UI consoles that just use REST for communication, and are not tied into the Java or JMX world etc.

Also the Java API on CamelContext allows you to control routes. And there is also the control-bus EIP that has more details: http://camel.apache.org/controlbus

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