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I'm learning C and I don't understand what factors determinate the needed compiler and why.

Let's say I'm having C code that is a little console application and I want to compile it for a specific platform. This platform would have a specific OS and instruction set.

  1. How does the instruction set affect which compiler is needed? Does it depend on the actual instruction set or only on its register size (16/32/64bit)? If it depends only on whether it is 64bit or 32bit, couldn't the instruction set look different and the machine code thus be not working? I'm confused about this because there are always 32bit and 64bit versions of an applicaiton offered, even though there are several possible instruction sets.

  2. Does the OS running on top of a specific instruction set affect which compiler is needed and why? Isn't the machine code the same if the CPU is the same?


UPDATE

Thanks to everybody who's answered. My final conclusion

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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

How does the instruction set affect which compiler is needed?

The compiler needs to produce different instructions if the processor has a different instruction set. Most compilers support multiple instruction sets so you may not need to change the compiler just because the instruction set changes.

Does it depend on the actual instruction set or only on its register size (16/32/64bit)?

Both.

If it depends only on whether it is 64bit or 32bit, couldn't the instruction set look different and the machine code thus be not working? I'm confused about this because there are always 32bit and 64bit versions of an applicaiton offered, even though there are several possible instruction sets.

While there are different instruction sets x86 and x64 dominate the desktop-market and most software vendors do not see a need to support anything else.

Does the OS running on top of a specific instruction set affect which compiler is needed and why? Isn't the machine code the same if the CPU is the same?

The instruction set is the same but the way to talk to the operating system is different. In principle you can run a windows application on a linux if they both run on the same instrucion set, however, the application will say "windows open that file" and linux has no idea what to do. The wine project fills the gap and runs windows applications under linux by translating "windows open that file" to "linux open that file" which gets complicated if more windows specific functions need to be implemented.

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So Intel and AMD CPUs marked as 64bit will most probably have the x64 instruction set? –  MinecraftShamrock Aug 5 at 12:33
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@MinecraftShamrock They have the same base instruction set. They differ a bit in things like SSE instructions but that is usually detected at runtime. There is the IA64 from intel that has a different instructions set, so Intel/AMD x64 does not guarantee compatibility. –  nwp Aug 5 at 12:37
    
And when these differences are detected, is the operating system able to compensate these differences? Say we have a download link for an application for Windows 7 64bit, is it equal whether it is compiled for Intel x64 or AMD x64 because the OS compensates it? And as you mentioned above, can these compilers that support multiple instruction sets produce applications that are compatible with both? –  MinecraftShamrock Aug 5 at 12:46
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@MinecraftShamrock The OS has no part in the compensation. The compiler produces instructions that work on any x86 including instructions to check if extensions exist and if so it uses some of them. Generally you compile for a generic x86, but you can also compile for a specific processor which slightly speeds up execution since you do not need feature checks but breaks whenever you use a slightly different processor. –  nwp Aug 5 at 12:52
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@MinecraftShamrock Sounds right to me. I would replace "generic compilates work on different instruction sets" with "generic compilates can be made to work on closely related instruction sets". –  nwp Aug 5 at 13:45
  1. It definitely depends on the machine your program will run. Not only on 8/16/32/64 registers, but also (and more importantly) on the instruction set itself. If you try to run a 32bit x86 program on a 32 bit ARM processor of course it won't work. That is simply because the machine code is very specific on every architecture and thus defines which bit does/means what. Even though the length of some instructions may be the same, operand ordering may be different or certain bits might have different meanings or (very likely) opcodes themselves may be totally different. Therefore a MOV on an x86 might as well have the same operation code as BLOWUPTHEWORLD on a different architecure. This is why there are specific compilers for each architecture. Embedded systems (think everything from a plane controller to RaspberryPis to AVRs that control toy cars) have different compilers for just about every family of processors/microcontrollers.

    The differences other than 32 vs 64 bit you see at most applications are somewhat shielded by the operating system, because one of the jobs of an OS is to provide abstractions (think system calls such as opening a file) regardless of what that means underneath (from the point of view of the low-level instructions). 32 vs 64 bit is a difference even an OS may not hide.

  2. Yes. Think about dynamic libraries. Microsoft's DLLs will surely not work on Linux except if some guy decodes them by hand. Viceversa, shared objects (.so) on Linux will not work on Windows simply because they are built in totally different ways.

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So the OS makes it able for the application not to care about the different versions of x64 or x86? –  MinecraftShamrock Aug 5 at 12:51
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x86 defines an instruction set and is backwards compatible all the way to the ancient Intel 8086. An application may be compiled with a general x86 compiler and never care which kind of machine runs beneath. If you want to make use of x86 extensions, you'll need a dedicated compiler that is aware of the benefits of those extensions. –  webuster Aug 5 at 13:00
    
Okey alright. So is this assumption right? stackoverflow.com/questions/25138294/… –  MinecraftShamrock Aug 5 at 13:16
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I don't see a problem with it. –  webuster Aug 5 at 13:32

All the factors you mention are important to your choice of compiler. The instruction set, the ABI including register size, the operating system both that you are trying to deploy to and that you want to run the compiler on. You can run different operating systems on the same machine (e.g. buy an iMac and you can install MacOS, several flavors of Linux, several Unixes, or Windows), so the CPU alone isn't enough to decide what compiler you need. Sometimes you can use the same compiler and you just need a different set of header files that allow access to the capabilities of your operating system.

However, that does not guarantee the choice of a particular compiler. A compiler is essentially just an application program. A converter that turns text into machine code. As such, there are many compilers that can be run on several platforms (i.e. combinatios of ABI, OS and CPU), and many compilers that can generate executables for several platforms. OTOH for some smaller CPUs and OSes (e.g. embedded CPUs) there is sometimes only one compiler.

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