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I have such trouble, when we start using new C++11, compiler (GCC) says that this code is wrong, but it works fine at older version :(

std::list<CCPoint> createPointArray(int count, ...) {
    CCPoint val;
    std::list<CCPoint*> arr;

    va_list vl;
    va_start(vl,count);
    for (int i=0;i<count;i++)
    {
        val = va_arg(vl,CCPoint*);
        arr.push_back(*val);
    }
    va_end(vl);

    return arr;
}

And this is the way, i'm using it:

createPointArray(3, &CCPoint(1.3,2.7), &CCPoint(1.5,1.75), &CCPoint(1.9,1.3))

Compiler tell me next:

Error   486 error : taking address of temporary [-fpermissive] (col 57) 

Why is it something wrong with &CCPoint(1.3,2.7) ? How can i change this code to be workable with C++11 and older version?

P.S.: I'am using Marmalade 7.3.1, Visual Studio 2010, cocos2d-x v2.2.1

share|improve this question
    
Why not simply use createPointArray(3, CCPoint(1.3,2.7), CCPoint(1.5,1.75), CCPoint(1.9,1.3)) and std::list<CCPoint> everywhere? – πάντα ῥεῖ Aug 5 '14 at 12:40
2  
Your code does not compile - va_arg(vl, CCPoint*) is a pointer so you can't assign it to val which is not a pointer. Then you do *val but val is not a pointer. And val cannot go into a list of CCPoint *. Post your real code? – M.M Aug 5 '14 at 13:08
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Taking the address of a prvalue temporary is illegal (and was indeed illegal in C++03 as well).

You can use a cast to change the value category to lvalue:

createPointArray(3,
  &static_cast<CCPoint const&>(CCPoint(1.3,2.7)),
  &static_cast<CCPoint const&>(CCPoint(1.5,1.75)),
  &static_cast<CCPoint const&>(CCPoint(1.9,1.3)));

This will work in both C++03 and C++11, as the temporary objects are not destroyed until the end of the enclosing full-expression.

Because you are passing the objects by pointer to const, you should extract them using va_arg(vl, CCPoint const*).

share|improve this answer

If you're using C++11, don't write this function in the first place. The new initializer list constructor will handle it for you:

std::list<CCPoint> l { CCPoint(1.3,2.7), CCPoint(1.5, 1.75), CCPoint(1.9, 1.3) };

If you want to keep using this variadic function for some reason, you can stop the compiler complaining that you take the address of a temporary by not taking the address of a temporary.

You may be able to pass the objects by value, although as ecatmur pointed out this is implementation-defined (it should be ok if copy and move constructors and destructor are all trivial):

std::list<CCPoint> m = createPointArray(3, CCPoint(1.3,2.7),
                                        CCPoint(1.5,1.75), CCPoint(1.9,1.3));

(you already declared val as a CCPoint instance - rather than a pointer - in your function. Just change the va_arg type to match).

Otherwise, you could fall back on passing the double values directly:

std::list<CCPoint> m = createPointArray(3, 1.3, 2.7, 1.5, 1.75, 1.9, 1.3);

std::list<CCPoint> createPointArray(int count, ...) {
    std::list<CCPoint> arr;

    va_list vl;
    va_start(vl,count);
    for (int i=0;i<count;i++) {
        double x = va_arg(vl,double);
        double y = va_arg(vl,double);
        arr.push_back(CCPoint(x,y));
    }
    va_end(vl);

    return arr;
}
share|improve this answer
3  
Passing objects of class type via ellipsis is implementation-defined behavior and may not be supported; see 5.2.2p7. – ecatmur Aug 5 '14 at 13:06
    
Hmm, good point. I didn't give that alternative much thought, since it's clearly inferior anyway. – Useless Aug 5 '14 at 15:25
    
std::list<CCPoint> l { {1.3, 2.7}, {1.5, 1.75), {1.9, 1.3} }; – Casey Aug 5 '14 at 17:41

You just cannot take address of a temporary, exactly what error says. You can easily fix this by passing by value:

std::list<CCPoint> createPointArray(int count, ...) {
    std::list<CCPoint> arr;

    va_list vl;
    va_start(vl,count);
    for (int i=0;i<count;i++)
        arr.push_back(va_arg(vl,CCPoint));
    va_end(vl);

    return arr;
}

createPointArray(3, CCPoint(1.3,2.7), CCPoint(1.5,1.75), CCPoint(1.9,1.3));

And, you don't need such a function now:

std::list<CCPoint> arr {CCPoint(1.3,2.7), CCPoint(1.5,1.75), CCPoint(1.9,1.3)};

is much simpler

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3  
Passing objects of class type via ellipsis is implementation-defined behavior and may not be supported; see 5.2.2p7. – ecatmur Aug 5 '14 at 13:07

In C++11, just use initializer_list:

std::list<CCPoint> l { CCPoint(1.3, 2.7), CCPoint(1.5, 1.75), CCPoint(1.9, 1.3) };

In C++03, you may have an array and then initialize your list with:

const CCPoint points[] = { CCPoint(1.3, 2.7), CCPoint(1.5, 1.75), CCPoint(1.9, 1.3) };

std::list<CCPoint> l(points, points + sizeof(points) / sizeof(*points));
// or std::list<CCPoint> l(points, points + 3); // error prone
// or std::list<CCPoint> l(std::begin(points), std::end(points)); // In C++11
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