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How do I achieve the Qt::UniqueConnection mechanism in Boost?

Basically, I only want to connect the signal for only once.

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1 Answer 1

As far as I know, there's no such thing, but you can easily mimic it using a custom combiner.

1. Using the custom Combiner

You can just ignore any excess slots. This combiner, for example, just ignores anything beyond the first slot (that is, the first added with at_front and no group, or the first in the group with the highest priority, see Ordering Slot Call Groups):

template<typename Result>
struct call_first    {
    typedef boost::optional<Result> result_type;

    template<typename It>
        result_type operator()(It first, It last) const {
            if (first != last)       
                return *first;
            return boost::none;
        }
};

Now here's a test case: Live On Coliru

#include <iostream>
#include <boost/optional/optional_io.hpp>

int foo(int i) { std::cout << "(foo)"; return i*2; }
int bar(int i) { std::cout << "(bar)"; return i+2; }

int main()
{
    using namespace boost::signals2;
    signal<int(int), call_first<int> > sig;
    std::cout << sig(42) << "\n"; // should be none ("--")

    sig.connect(foo);
    std::cout << sig(42) << "\n"; // should return 42*2

    sig.connect(bar);

    std::cout << sig(42) << "\n"; // should still return 42*2
}

Printing

--
(foo) 84
(foo) 84

2. Fix your connection management

You can make it easy to avoid double-connecting a signal, by using pretty simple helpers (assuming c++11 for this sample):

template <typename Sig, typename F> void try_connect(Sig& sig, F&& f) {
    if (!sig.num_slots()) sig.connect(std::forward<F>(f));
}

template <typename Sig, typename F> void re_connect(Sig& sig, F&& f) {
    sig.disconnect_all_slots();
    sig.connect(std::forward<F>(f));
}

The corresponding test case Live On Coliru:

int main()
{
    using namespace boost::signals2;
    signal<int(int)> sig;
    std::cout << sig(42) << "\n"; // should be none ("--")

    try_connect(sig, foo);
    std::cout << sig(42) << "\n"; // should return 42*2

    try_connect(sig, bar);
    std::cout << sig(42) << "\n"; // should still return 42*2

    re_connect(sig, bar);
    std::cout << sig(42) << "\n"; // should return 42+2
}

Output:

--
(foo) 84
(foo) 84
(bar) 44
share|improve this answer
    
This is very interesting! But I have a hard time understanding the call_first function. Could you please explain? Its name seems to suggest that only the first connected slots will be called, does it mean the subsequent connected slots are just ignored? If I call sig.connect lots of time, does it consume lots of memory? –  jiawen Aug 6 at 1:52
    
It indeed just ignores anything beyond the first slot (that is, the first added with at_front and no group, or the first in the group with the highest priority). Of course whether that "takes a lot of memory" depends. I'd say fix the code smell if you really expect to connect waaaaay too many times: just hide your connection logic. Updated my answer too. –  sehe Aug 6 at 10:35

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