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From time to time, I use a while(1) block to flatten a succession of if..else going out of proportion. It goes along these lines.

Instead of doing:

// process 
if (success) {
  // process 
  if (success) {
    //process
    if (success) {
      // etc
    }
  }
}

I do:

while (1) {
  // process
  if (!success) break;
  // process
  if (!success) break;
  // process
  if (!success) break;
  // etc
  break;
}

I am a little annoyed by the implicit jump at the end of the while. Could I get away with a leaner construct (ie no break at the end)?

I could trade the final break with a variable (or register?). That's not exactly leaner or clearer.

int once = 1;
while (once--) {
  // process
  if (!success) break;
  // process
  if (!success) break;
  // process
  if (!success) break;
  // etc
}

A for loop would look a bit better (C99):

for (int once = 1 ; once--; once) {
  // process
  if (!success) break;
  // process
  if (!success) break;
  // process
  if (!success) break;
  // etc
}

I thought about using a switch case. It does not look much better , though it would work.

switch (1) { default:
  // process
  if (!success) break;
  // process
  if (!success) break;
  // process
  if (!success) break;
  // etc
}

In that particular case the concept of a label seems unbeatable.

// process
if (!success) goto end;
// process
if (!success) goto end;
// process
if (!success) goto end;
// etc

end:

What other approach do you guys know/use?

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marked as duplicate by Frank van Puffelen, Benjamin Gruenbaum, hjpotter92, Evert, anatolyg Aug 7 at 10:08

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

70  
Allow me to express strong, strong disapproval of using a loop construct for something that isn't a loop. @ouah's suggestion of hoisting nested conditions out to a separate function is by far the best option here. –  Russell Borogove Aug 5 at 20:49
9  
related: How to avoid “if” chains? –  chue x Aug 6 at 2:36
3  
Whatever you do, don't try to make a loop into a label, just because someone told you labels are bad and loops aren't. –  immibis Aug 6 at 3:06
2  
Advance to c++ and throw() ;) –  SF. Aug 6 at 9:36
3  
If you had used a goto for the second solution while(1) { if(error) break; }, it would be much more honest. You use the loop exit as a goto label without telling it anywhere. This is not a while loop, it is just obfuscated code. –  JensG Aug 6 at 14:34

6 Answers 6

up vote 49 down vote accepted

The following is a method very similar to what you're doing with the loops, but without the need for a counter or a break statement at the end.

do
{
    // process
    if (!success) break;
    // process
    if (!success) break;
    // process
    if (!success) break;
    ...
    // No need for a break statement here
}
while(0);
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58  
while loops like this are an odd way to avoid goto. goto can and should be used in the cases that O.P. mentioned. –  Pavan Yalamanchili Aug 5 at 18:05
10  
This is infinitely to goto; the target of break is well defined and immutable. With a goto you could have any number of destination targets - the restrictiveness of break enforces structure. I can imagine copy&pasting a block of code an omitting to change the label name for example. –  Clifford Aug 5 at 18:59
40  
@FiddlingBits People are taught not to use goto because it can lead to complex and obfuscated code. In this particular case you are essentially replicating what goto does naturally by using do / while. If someone not familiar with the code starts looking at the code, they will have no idea why you have a loop until they come across the while(0). It does not immediately convey what the code is supposed to be doing. –  Pavan Yalamanchili Aug 5 at 19:00
6  
@PavanYalamanchili : Well said, it deserves a clear comment at least - for the poor (and often inexperienced) maintainer! –  Clifford Aug 5 at 19:23
19  
The hatred of goto derives from Dijkstra trying to force structured programming into a world that didn't want it. Not using goto isn't "good practice"; it's a 40-year-old irrelevancy taken out of context. The OP's use case is actually a standard use for goto--one in which it is the right language feature: resulting in cleaner, simpler, and faster code. –  GraphicsResearch Aug 6 at 11:40

Not clear why you'd need to nest or break. I do this all the time when a sequence needs to bail at first failure:

// process

if (success) {
  // more process
}

if (success) {
  // still more process
}

if (success) {
  // even more process
}
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21  
Beginners save nanoseconds. Real programmers save milliseconds. And use a compiler that handles that kind of situation. –  gnasher729 Aug 5 at 22:41
5  
"you waste CPU cycles" -- Only if your compiler was written by an incompetent. A decent optimizing compiler will skip tests of the same condition. –  Jim Balter Aug 6 at 11:16
2  
@JimBalter The compiler can't skip/combine these if statements because success can change at any time during the process. Only during execution can the state of success be known. –  Fiddling Bits Aug 6 at 19:20
3  
@FiddlingBits The compiler can skip the if statements as soon as success = false. –  Moby Disk Aug 6 at 21:01
2  
No, it would be a fairly trivial bit of static analysis for the compiler to pick up that once success is false for any of those conditions, it will be false for all, since we never enter the "process" blocks and change it. –  Paul Roub Aug 6 at 21:08

Fiddling bits has provided a common approach. Another common approach is to use a single status variable/flag to achieve a similar result.

bool bErr = false;

if (!bErr && success) {
   // do something
} else {
   bErr = true;
}
if (!bErr && success2) {
   // do something
} else {
   bErr = true;
}

if (bErr) {
   // hanlde cleanup from errors
}
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1  
You could change the if statements to if (!(bErr |= !success)) {...} (or something similar) and forego any need for those verbose else statements (my opinion) –  Serge Aug 5 at 18:06
    
@Serge The point of the else statements is to set the error flag. The point of this is so that if any single block fails, the error flag is set, and no further blocks are executed. –  Dogbert Aug 5 at 18:07
    
In my sample, the bErr flag is set to true any time success is false, or stays set to true even if success is true, and forces the if statement to fail. Same idea, different implementation. But yes, I know some people don't like using assignment operators within if-statements. –  Serge Aug 5 at 18:18
    
@Serge Yeah, you should really avoid assignments within an evaluation (ie: if statement), since it could be "short-circuited out of existence" (en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Short-circuit_evaluation), or within a logging or debug statement, since the optimizer or even compile-time settings (ie: ifdefs) may prevent the assignment from ever occurring. –  Dogbert Aug 5 at 18:20
3  
they're not detrimental when people know what they're doing (in the if statement scenario). Short circuiting should apply to the ||, && and ? operators (according to the source supplied), rather than the if statement itself. Still, it is a trade-off of succinctness vs readability. –  Serge Aug 5 at 18:31

What other approach do you guys know/use?

You can encapsulate your while loop in a function (and call this function where you had your while loop):

static void process(void)
{
   // process
   if (!success) return;
   // process
   if (!success) return;
   // process
   if (!success) return;
   // process
}

Any halfway decent compiler (e.g., even gcc with optimizations disabled) will inline a static function if it is called once. (Of course some variables may have to be in the lexical scope of process function, in that case just provide them as parameters of the function).

Note that writing code from top to bottom instead of horizontally (e.g., your example with nested if) is called duffing. There is a nice article on the subject here:

"Reading Code From Top to Bottom"

Also, in the Linux kernel coding style there is a specific warning writinh against horizontal code:

"if you need more than 3 levels of indentation, you're screwed anyway, and should fix your program"

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13  
+1 This is a great solution too. Perhaps return an error code instead of void though. –  Fiddling Bits Aug 5 at 19:51
1  
@PhilippeA. I think it comes from Duff's device en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Duff's_device If you never encountered it, I highly suggest you to read the page and notice the weird structure of the switch statement with the embedded do while statement inside. –  ouah Aug 5 at 20:56
2  
9  
@ABFORCE - do you actually know what the purpose of single-return-point advice was, or do you just follow the cult? –  Davor Aug 6 at 13:55
5  
@Davor the cult –  ABFORCE Aug 6 at 14:01

If you arrange that the body of each conditional block generating success is a function as follows or each // process can otherwise be reduced to a boolean expression, such as:

success = f1() ; 
if( success ) 
{
  success = f2() ; 
  if( success ) 
  {
    success = f3() ; 
    if( success ) 
    {
      success = f4()
    }
  }
}

Then you can reduce this to a single boolean expression exploiting short-circuit evaluation:

success = f1() && 
          f2() && 
          f3() && 
          f4() ;

Here f2() will not be called if f1() returns false and the same for each successive call - expression evaluation aborts on the first && operand sub-expression to return false.

share|improve this answer
    
I like your solution cold logic. However it is not very practical to encapsulate my processing in many different functions. @ouah's variant is more useful in my case. –  Philippe A. Aug 5 at 20:11
3  
Agreed it is not perhaps generally applicable and therefore not "the answer", but it is worth mentioning. –  Clifford Aug 5 at 20:27
    
Worth an upvote too btw. –  Philippe A. Aug 5 at 20:38
1  
Or you could write just one additional function, as in oauh's answer. It depends on whether these functions are really separable or not. –  Jim Balter Aug 6 at 11:19
1  
@JimBalter : Of course but the "What other approach do you guys know/use?" rather invites alternatives and they cannot all be accepted. This kind of question is not a good fit for SO perhaps. –  Clifford Aug 6 at 14:45

Another option would be using a simple flag variable

bool okay = true;

if(okay &= success){
    // process
}

if(okay &= success){
    // process
}

if(okay &= success){
    // process
}
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4  
If a single unconditional jump at the end of the original while-loop is annoying, then lots o fsuperfluous conditional jumps are probably more annoying –  Hagen von Eitzen Aug 6 at 15:45

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