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Please see following methods.

    public static ProductsCollection GetDummyData(int? customerId, int? supplierId)
    {
        try
        {
            if (customerId != null && customerId > 0)
            {
                Filter.Add(Customres.CustomerId == customerId);
            }

            if (supplierId != null && supplierId > 0)
            {
                Filter.Add(Suppliers.SupplierId == supplierId);
            }

            ProductsCollection products = new ProductsCollection();

            products.FetchData(Filter);

            return products;
        }
        catch
        {
            throw;
        }
    }

    public static ProductsCollection GetDummyData(int? customerId)
    {
        return ProductsCollection GetDummyData(customerId, (int?)null);
    }

    public static ProductsCollection GetDummyData()
    {
        return ProductsCollection GetDummyData((int?)null);
    }

1- Please advice how can I make overloads for both CustomerId and SupplierId because only one overload can be created with GetDummyData(int? ). Should I add another argument to mention that first argument is CustomerId or SupplierId for example GetDummyData(int?, string). OR should I use enum as 2nd argument and mention that first argument is CustoemId or SupplierId.

2- Is this condition is correct or just checking > 0 is sufficient -> if (customerId != null && customerId > 0)

3- Using Try/catch like this is correct?

4- Passing (int?)null is correct or any other better approach.

Edit:

I have found some other posts like this and because I have no knowledge of Generics that is why I am facing this problem. Am I right? Following is the post.

http://stackoverflow.com/questions/422625/overloaded-method-calling-overloaded-method

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted
  1. Why not just create separate GetCustomerData(int) and GetSupplierData(int) methods? (Along with GetData() and GetData(int,int) if you need them.)

  2. If you change your method arguments to int rather than int? then you only need to check (at your discretion) that they're greater than 0.

  3. There's no need for the try...catch in this situation. If all you're doing is re-throwing the exception then don't bother catching it in the first place.

  4. See 1 and 2 above.

EDIT: Maybe something like this...

public static ProductsCollection GetData()
{
    return GetDataImpl(-1, -1);
}

public static ProductsCollection GetData(int customerId, int supplierId)
{
    if (customerId <= 0)
        throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException("customerId");

    if (supplierId <= 0)
        throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException("supplierId");

    return GetDataImpl(customerId, supplierId);
}

public static ProductsCollection GetCustomerData(int customerId)
{
    if (customerId <= 0)
        throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException("customerId");

    return GetDataImpl(customerId, -1);
}

public static ProductsCollection GetSupplierData(int supplierId)
{
    if (supplierId <= 0)
        throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException("supplierId");

    return GetDataImpl(-1, supplierId);
}

private static ProductsCollection GetDataImpl(int customerId, int supplierId)
{
    if (customerId > 0)
        Filter.Add(Customers.CustomerId == customerId);

    if (supplierId > 0)
        Filter.Add(Suppliers.SupplierId == supplierId);

    ProductsCollection products = new ProductsCollection();
    products.FetchData(Filter);

    return products;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your suggestion, can you please comment on my edit? –  Kashif Mar 25 '10 at 11:58
    
I don't think that generics, or the other question mentioned in your edit, are relevant in this case. –  LukeH Mar 25 '10 at 12:08
    
Thanks for your time and comments. If this don't bother you can you please tell me why I have to create separate methods. Why should I not overload this method. If I have to create separate methods writing much or less same code then what is the purpose of method overloading. –  Kashif Mar 25 '10 at 12:35
    
You cannot create multiple overloads with that take the same type of parameters becuase they then have the same signature, this is the reason to create to differently named methods. The differently named methods will require exactly the same code as overloads. There can be several reasons to overload methods, primaraly you do it so that you can have optional parameters that take default values in the overloaded methods. You can also do it to have mutliple methods that take and return different types, but this problem is better solved using generics so long as you are using c# 2.0 and above. –  Ben Robinson Mar 25 '10 at 12:52
    
And further more definitely remove the try/catch. All your code does there is make it harder to debug becuase it is then more dificult to see where the exception occurs because it will always occur at the throw statment. –  Ben Robinson Mar 25 '10 at 12:54

You aren't doing anything with the try catch, so why include it. You exception is going to bubble up to the calling method anyway, so just remove the extraneous try catch code.

I would ditch the second and the third methods as they aren't really doing anything. Unless you have some reason to keep them around, like they are legacy code, I would remove them. It will just make the code more complicated for future support.

share|improve this answer
    
I need no argument, fetch data without filter, or I want to fetch data on CustomerId or SupplierId or on both, that is why I am creating Overloads. Don't I need these in my scenario? –  Kashif Mar 25 '10 at 11:54

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