Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have an application that is multithreaded and working OK. However it's hitting lock contention issues (checked by snapshotting the java stack and seeing whats waiting).

Each thread consumes objects off a list and either rejects each or places it into a Bin.

The Bins are initially null as each can be expensive (and there is potentially a lot of them).

The code that is causing the contention looks roughly like this:

public void addToBin(Bin[] bins, Item item) {
   Bin bin;
   int bin_index = item.bin_index
   synchronized(bins) {
      bin = bins[bin_index];
      if(bin==null) {
        bin = new Bin();
        bins[bin_index] = bin;
      }
   }
   synchronized(bin) {
     bin.add(item);
   }
}

It is the synchronization on the bins array that is the bottleneck.

It was suggested to me by a colleague to use double checked locking to solve this, but we're unsure exactly what would be involved to make it safe. The suggested solution looks like this:

public void addToBin(Bin[] bins, Item item) {
   int bin_index = item.bin_index
   Bin bin = bins[bin_index];

   if(bin==null) {
     synchronized(bins) {
        bin = bins[bin_index];
        if(bin==null) {
          bin = new Bin();
          bins[bin_index] = bin;
        }
     }
   }

   synchronized(bin) {
     bin.add(item);
   }
}

Is this safe and/or is there a better/safer/more idiomatic way to do this?

share|improve this question
    
Why not use a queue feeding one collector thread that manages the bins? –  chrylis Aug 6 at 7:17
1  
Also, be more specific about "expensive" and "a lot". Unless we're talking native data structures or reflection and hundreds of thousands, this lazy initialization looks like premature optimization. (Given that your binning is worth the overhead of multithreading, I presume your input data set is large.) –  chrylis Aug 6 at 7:26
1  
Millions of bins is not unusual. Data sets can be 10s of terabytes. Memory usage is 10s-100s GB. –  Michael Anderson Aug 6 at 7:38
1  
Why is this all being kept in RAM, then? That sounds like the sort of job where appending to a file per bin would be more effective. –  chrylis Aug 6 at 7:46
    
This is all getting kept in memory because hitting disk is slow. Its already pulling the objects off disk as little as possible, writing intermediate results back to disk will kill performance (far worse than existing lock contention). Once the data is binned and processed final reduced results will go to disk. –  Michael Anderson Aug 6 at 7:52

4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

As already stated in the answer of Malt, Java already provides many lock-free data structures and concepts that can be used to solve this problem. I'd like to add a more detailed example using AtomicReferenceArray:

Assuming, bins is an AtomicReferenceArray, the following code performs a lock free update in case of a null entry:

Bin bin = bins.get(index);
while (bin == null) {
    bin = new Bin();
    if (!bins.compareAndSet(index, null, bin)) {
        // some other thread already set the bin in the meantime
        bin = bins.get(index);
    }
}
// use bin as usual

Since Java 8, there is a more elegant solution for that:

Bin bin = bins.updateAndGet(index, oldBin -> oldBin == null ? new Bin() : oldBin);
// use bin as usual

Node: The Java 8 version is - while still non-blocking - perceptibly slower than the Java 7 version above due to the fact that updateAndGet will always update the array even if the value does not change. This might or might not be negligible depending on the overal costs for the entire bin-update-operation.


Another very elegant strategy might be to just pre-fill the entire bins array with newly created Bin instances, before handing over the array to the worker threads. As the threads then don't have to modify the array, this will reduce the needs for synchronization to the Bin objects themselves. Fill the array can be easily done multi-threaded by using Arrays.parallelSetAll (since Java 8):

Arrays.parallelSetAll(bins, i -> new Bin());

Update 2: If this is an option depends on the expected output of your algorithm: Will in the end the bins array be filled totally, densely or just sparsely? (In the first case, pre-filling is advicable. In the second case, it depends - as so often. In the latter case it's probably a bad idea).


Update 1: Don't use double-checked-locking! It is not safe! The problem here is visibility, not atomicitiy. In your case, the reading thread might get a partly constructed (hence corrupt) Bin instance. For details see http://www.cs.umd.edu/~pugh/java/memoryModel/DoubleCheckedLocking.html.

share|improve this answer
    
From the OP's question: The Bins are initially null as each can be expensive (and there is potentially a lot of them)., thus the option of setting them up ahead of time does not seem viable. –  Matthieu M. Aug 6 at 9:19
    
@MatthieuM. You're right. Embarrassingly missed that part. The question is if the bins array will be totally, densely, or just sparsely filled in the end. In the first two cases, using parallelSetAll might be still an option. –  isnot2bad Aug 6 at 10:06
    
@MatthieuM. updated my answer to respect your concerns. –  isnot2bad Aug 6 at 10:12
    
updateAndGet will always behave like an update (i.e. perform a volatile write) even if the value does not change. So it’s not a “very elegant” solution. An elegant solution would be a function like compareAndSet taking a Supplier but such a function doesn’t exist… Btw. if you know that the reference value will never change from non-null to null you don’t need the while loop. A simple if will do. –  Holger Aug 6 at 10:30
    
Don't feel bad, it's easily missed, and prefilling removes a lot of issues. I was actually hoping you would suggest adding a layer of indirection here: if we had a Lazy<Bin> with a get() method that lazily instantiates the Bin the first time it is called (securely), then you could prefill the array of Lazy<Bin> and then avoid locking the array itself. –  Matthieu M. Aug 6 at 12:00

Java has a variety of excellent lock-free concurrent data structures, so there's really no need to use arrays with synchronizations for this type of thing.

ConcurrentSkipListMap is a concurrent, sorted, key-value map. ConcurrentHashMap is a concurrent unsorted key-value.

You can simply use one of these instead of the array. Just set the map key be the Integer index you already use and you're good to go.

There's also Google's ConcurrentLinkedHashMap and Google's Guava Cache, which are excellent for keeping ordered data, and for removing old entries.

share|improve this answer
4  
Not to forget AtomicReferenceArray. –  isnot2bad Aug 6 at 7:47
    
@isnot2bad I looked at AtomicReferenceArray just before posting the original question. I couldn't see a way to translate the code above into it's available features. But it's likely I'm missing something. If it can be used to solve it - I'd love to see an answer demonstrating how. –  Michael Anderson Aug 6 at 7:55
    
@Malt You're right, is it not as easy as I thought. Too much code to post as a comment. I've added a new answer for that. –  isnot2bad Aug 6 at 8:17

I would advise against the 2nd solution because it accesses the bins array outside of a synchronized block therefore it is not guaranteed the changes made by another thread is visible to the code that is reading an element from it unsynchronized.

It is not guaranteed that a concurrently added new Bin will be seen therefore it might create a new Bin for the same index again and discard a concurrently created and stored one - also forgetting that items might be placed in the discarded one.

share|improve this answer
    
I don't think so. In the second solution, it is checked again if the bin remained null in the synchronized area. So it is guaranteed, only one bin is added. –  EarlGrey Aug 6 at 7:16
    
You're right. I missed the 2nd check... –  icza Aug 6 at 7:17
    
At least there is one path of execution that does not synchronize properly on the array, so there might be a subtle, yet overlooked visibility issue that makes it fail. So it's a good advice to advice against double checked locking, especially when there are other far more elegant ways to solve this problem. –  isnot2bad Aug 6 at 7:54
    
@isnot2bad What execution path? I'm willing to learn and don't see a problematic path. –  EarlGrey Aug 6 at 8:22
2  
@EarlGrey If the bin retrieved from the array is not null, the code path does not enter the block synchronizing on the array, hence the reading thread might not see a fully constructed Bin instance. See cs.umd.edu/~pugh/java/memoryModel/DoubleCheckedLocking.html for details. It's a visibility issue, not an issue concerning atomicity. –  isnot2bad Aug 6 at 8:31

If none of the built in java classes help you, you could just create 8 bins locks, say binsALock to binsFLock.

Then divide bin_index by 8, use the reminder to choose the lock to use.


If you choose a larger number that is more than the number of threads you have, and use a lock that is very fast when it is contended, then you may do better than choosing 8.

You may also get better result by reducing the number of threads you use.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.