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I need to echo a string containing angle brackets (< and >) to a file on a Windows machine. Basically what I want to do is the following:
echo some string < with angle > brackets >>myfile.txt

This doesn't work since the command interpreter gets confused with the angle brackets. I could quote the whole string like this:
echo "some string < with angle > brackets" >>myfile.txt

But then I have double quotes in my file that I don't want.

Escaping the brackets ala unix doesn't work either:
echo some string \< with angle \> brackets >>myfile.txt

Ideas?

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what is wrong with quotes? –  Oskar Oct 30 '08 at 20:10
    
The quotes will also be echoed. –  dalle Oct 30 '08 at 20:12

4 Answers 4

up vote 58 down vote accepted

The Windows escape character is ^, for some reason.

echo some string ^< with angle ^> brackets >>myfile.txt
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3  
Well, backslash is used for pathnames and double-quote is to wrap filename which have spaces, so there not many character choices left. –  James Curran Oct 30 '08 at 20:27
    
This also works for other characters like ampersand (&), thanks. –  tenfour Feb 23 '11 at 17:20
    
Works great! echo some string ^< with angle ^> brackets >>con results in: some string < with angle > brackets –  Ross Bradbury Jun 16 '11 at 14:33
    
All because the original pc-dos used backslash for paths and backward compatibility. –  Jahmic May 30 at 6:13

True, the official escape character is ^, but be careful because sometimes you need three ^ characters. This is just sometimes:

C:\WINDOWS> echo ^<html^>
<html>

C:\WINDOWS> echo ^<html^> | sort
The syntax of the command is incorrect.

C:\WINDOWS> echo ^^^<html^^^> | sort
<html>

C:\WINDOWS> echo ^^^<html^^^>
^<html^>

One trick out of this nonsense is to use a command other than echo to do the output and quote with double quotes:

C:\WINDOWS> set/p _="<html>" <nul
<html>
C:\WINDOWS> set/p _="<html>" <nul | sort
<html>
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Thank you. That is not obvious. –  user1167442 Aug 24 '13 at 23:21

Escaping the brackets ala unix doesn't work either:

echo some string \< with angle \> brackets >>myfile.txt

The backslash would be considered the start of a absolute pathname.

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2  
Absolute pathname relative to the current drive letter... ;) –  dalle Oct 31 '08 at 8:54

You can also use double quotes to escape special characters...

echo some string "<" with angle ">" brackets >>myfile.txt
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1  
That does not work. echo some string "<" with angle ">" brackets >>con results in: some string "<" with angle ">" brackets but the OP wants some string < with angle > brackets –  Ross Bradbury Jun 16 '11 at 14:31

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