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I have an application that must check a folder and read any files that are copied into it. How do I test if a file in that folder is currently being written to? I only want to read files that have had all their data written to them and are closed.

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1  
@willsan - Please remember to accept the answer if it helped you. –  Kyle Rozendo Apr 15 '10 at 20:35

9 Answers 9

It ain't clean, but it works:

try
{
    using (Stream stream = new FileStream("File.txt"))
    {
    }
} 
catch 
{
    // Check if file is in use (or whatever else went wrong), and do any user communication that you need to
}

I don't particularly like using exceptions as conditions, but as far as I know this is about the easiest and best (and only reliable) way to do this.

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I think try-catch is basically the only fail-safe way to test the file. Too bad they don't have a IsOpen property in the File or FileInfo classes.. –  KP. Mar 25 '10 at 13:22
1  
+1: This is the ONLY way to do it. Imaging there's a call on the file object "IsOpen", there is nothing stopping another process locking the file between you calling IsOpen and you opening the file. The only way to see if you can get a lock is to try to lock it (and then keep it locked). –  Binary Worrier Mar 25 '10 at 13:24
    
The problem he's trying to solve is inherently prone to race conditions. As I explained in my answer below, actually the approach listed above will fail if the "writing process" writes one chunk at a time (closing the file between consecutive writes). I think having such a process is much more likely than having a process that wrote nothing for X seconds, and then suddenly restarts writing just as you start doing your job. Anyway, regardless of the approach, additional syncrhonization is needed, for sure. –  Virgil Mar 25 '10 at 13:29
    
@Binary - Added the "and only reliable", thanks! @Virgil - That is true, but fact is that there's no way to lock a file (or see if its locked) for use, without trying to lock it yourself. –  Kyle Rozendo Mar 25 '10 at 13:29
1  
@Virgil - and then as your method finds no handles and is about to return, the file gets locked by another process. Then what? –  Kyle Rozendo Mar 25 '10 at 13:57

Perhaps opening the file exclusively like this -

System.IO.File.Open(PathToFile, FileMode.Open, FileAccess.ReadWrite, FileShare.None);

That could be placed in a loop with a try/catch until its successful.

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You may want a conditional retry in the catch. I typically have a counter and a Thread.Sleep(500) so I don't pound the I/O and can still bail if something such as a disk crash occures. –  Matthew Whited Mar 25 '10 at 15:03

The only thing I can think of is that a file lock will be put on the file while it is being written to, therefore preventing you from writing to it (throwing a System.IO exception of file being locked by another process), but this is not foolproof. For example, the file could be written to in chunks by opening and closing the file for each chunk.

So you could do this with a try/catch block:

try
{
   //opening the file
} 
catch(IOException ex)
{
   // file is open by another process
}
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The file that is written to will typically have write locks on it so if you try to open it for write, you'll fail; but OTOH you may have a process that opens, writes, and closes the file - then repeats. I think the simplest and safest way would be simply to check for files that were written to recently, but not TOO recent (e.g. not in the last 2 seconds or so)

[l.e.] Another point to consider is that if you have a process that writes data in chunck (open-write-close), and you get an exclusive lock for the file (to check that the file is no longer used) - than your external process will fail. I think it's far better to check the timestamps, and only get the exclusive lock after you're reasonably sure that the other process finished writing.

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The external process should handle such the case as well. To give an example as your talking about, writing to a log, or common log, shared between processes. The log is opened whenever it is needed by some process, that process is responsible for gaining the file lock safely. If it doesn't gain the file lock is should handle that exception properly such as sleeping for a bit or trying again at some later time. If your just looking at time stamps then there is no reliable way to know by the timestamp that the log will be written to when you try to get the file lock. –  galford13x Mar 25 '10 at 14:08
    
The keyword here is "should". We all now that not all applications are .... perfect. The idea is that you know few things about the external process that writes those files, and that process is probably well outside your control. –  Virgil Mar 25 '10 at 14:48

Catching exception is expensive you should try to use this:

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.io.filesystemwatcher.aspx

There's a super clear example on the msdn page. That'll give you nice events on change, created, delete, renamed.

copy the file into the folder and rename when your done catch the rename event and your sure your not reading files that aren't finished yet.

Or you could catch the change events until (this is tricky) they aren't fired anymore.

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Unfortunately, in my case the file being written to is from a third party program. –  Ernest Mar 4 '14 at 23:09
    
@ErnestSoeralaya That shoudn't matter this works for all programs writing to the file you're watching. –  albertjan Mar 5 '14 at 7:37
    
Wouldn't renaming the file being generated require the ability to change the behavior of such program? –  Ernest Mar 5 '14 at 18:51
    
A FSW could serve as a launching point for determining whether some file has changed, however the change notification doesn't come with any guarantees: it's just an event saying that a file has been written to (for example). It does not tell you whether 1) the write is completed, 2) whether the file still exists or 3) whether there are any other locks on the file. –  rianjs May 23 '14 at 17:02

Number of options. The one that springs to mind straight away is to try opening the file for write. If you raise an exception, it is still being written to. Wait for a defined period and try again.

Alternatively check the timestamps and only try reading the file 1 or 2 minutes after the timestamp last changed

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Use the System.IO.FileSystemWatcher to determine files that are changed.

Open them in an exclusive reader (FileMode.Read) in make the copies, and catch the exception should this fail (because someone else has it open for writing).

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When you open it with System.IO.File.OpenWrite(filename), it should throw IOException.

So, in a try catch, the code being executed in the catch block should tell you the file was open.

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If you have any control over the process that does the writing in, then consider augmenting it so the following process happens:

  1. Process starts writing file "filename.xyz"
  2. Process writes more of file "filename.xyz"
  3. ....
  4. ....
  5. Process finishes writing file "filename.xyz"
  6. Process writes another (zero-length, empty) file to the folder called "filename.xyz.done"

You can look for ".done" files as the trigger to start processing a file. Again, this will only work if you have any way to modify the process that does the writing in of files.

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