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Hi Could you please give me an example for Deferred execution with eager evaluation in C#?

I read from MSDN that deferred execution in LINQ can be implemented either with lazy or eager evaluation...i could find examples in the internet for Deferred execution with lazy evaluation ,however i could not find any example for Deferred execution with eager evaluation....please help me....its urgent...

Moreover,how deferred execution differs from lazy evaluation?In my point of view,both are looking same.Could you please provide any example for this too?

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2 Answers 2

Bellow is my answer but also note that John Skeet spoke about it today on his blog an about the fact that he is not totally ok with the MSDN meaning of "Lazy" as MSDN isn't really clear of what lazy exactly mean when they use it in Just how lazy are you ? his post make for an interesting read.

Additionally Wikipedia assume that three rules should be maintained for lazy evaluation and third point isn't respected in MSDN meaning as the expression will be evaluated more than once if GetEnumerator is called again (By the spec Reset is not implemented on enumerator objects generated using the yield keyword and most of linq use it currently)


Considering a function

int Computation(int index)

Immediate execution

IEnumerable<int> GetComputation(int maxIndex)
{
    var result = new int[maxIndex];
    for(int i = 0; i < maxIndex; i++)
    {
        result[i] = Computation(i);
    }
    return result;
}
  • When the function is called Computation is executed maxIndex + 1 times
  • GetEnumerator return a new instance of the enumerator doing nothing more.
  • Each call to MoveNext put the the value stored in the next Array cell in the Current member of the IEnumerator and that's all.

Cost: Big upfront, Small during enumeration (only a copy)

Deferred but eager execution

IEnumerable<int> GetComputation(int maxIndex)
{
    var result = new int[maxIndex];
    for(int i = 0; i < maxIndex; i++)
    {
        result[i] = Computation(i);
    }
    foreach(var value in result)
    {
        yield return value;
    }
}
  • When the function is called an instance of an auto generated class (called "enumerable object" in the spec) implementing IEnumerable is created and a copy of the argument (maxIndex) is stored in it.
  • GetEnumerator return a new instance of the enumerator doing nothing more.
  • The first call to MoveNext execute maxIndex+1 times the compute method, store the result in an array and Current will return the first value.
  • Each subsequent call to MoveNext will put in Current a value stored in the array.

Cost: nothing upfront, Big when the enumeration start, Small during enumeration (only a copy)

Deferred and lazy execution

IEnumerable<int> GetComputation(int maxIndex)
{
    for(int i = 0; i < maxIndex; i++)
    {
        yield return Computation(i);
    }
}
  • When the function is called the same thing as the lazy execution case happens.
  • GetEnumerator return a new instance of the enumerator doing nothing more.
  • Each call to MoveNext execute once the Computation code, put the value in Current and let the caller immediately act on the result.

Most of linq use deferred and lazy execution but some functions can't be so like sorting.

Cost: nothing upfront, Moderate during enumeration (the computation is executed there)

To summarize

  • Immediate mean that the computation/execution is done in the function and finished once the function return. (Fully eager evaluation as most C# code does)
  • Deferred/Eager mean that most of the work will be done on the first MoveNext or when the IEnumerator instance is created (For IEnumerable it is when GetEnumerator is called)
  • Deferred/Lazy mean that the work will be done each time MoveNext is called but nothing before.

Parallel LINQ does it a little differently as the computation could be considered deferred/Lazy from the point of view of the caller but internally the computation of some number of elements begin in parallel as soon as the enumeration begin. The result is that if the next value is already there you get it immediately but otherwise you will have to wait for it.

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VirtualBlackFox -> thank you very much ...this is tan excellent explanation which i have never seen (atleast on this topic :) )..... but I am not still clear with your example for "deferred but eager evaluation"...,when we use yeild return keyword,it becomes lazy ...then how come you say that as "eager evaluation"..could you please explain this? moreover,how deferred execution differs from lazy evaluation?both deferred execution and lazy evaluation are same?? –  babu M Mar 26 '10 at 2:44
    
The description i added under each example show the difference : in this case deferred mean that the execution will be done when enumerating not when calling the function. When eager even if it happens latter all the computation will be done at the same time (when GetNext is first called) while lazy evaluation implies that each GetNext call do a part of the work. –  Julien Roncaglia Mar 26 '10 at 9:39
4  
The best example for the difference are "Select" and "Reverse" : Both are deferred, the source enumerable is just stored by the call to the method. Select is lazy as each time GetNext is called on the result, GetNext is called on the source, it even work with infinite sources and if a complex computation is done by the source the load will be distributed. Reverse in the other hand is eager, it need to walk the whole source enumerable before even returning it's first element, if the source is doing complex computations they will all be executed on the first GetNext call on the result. –  Julien Roncaglia Mar 26 '10 at 9:51
    
There are at least two bugs in the code. new List<int>(maxIndex) does not add any elements to the list. Changing it to an array will fix that, but then the for loop with i <= maxIndex will exceed the bounds of the array. And I think you mean MoveNext. –  TrueWill Jan 16 '12 at 23:35
    
@TrueWill Thanks, fixed everywhere and added some more details. I shouldn't write code using helper extension methods then not post them when posting the samples (for GetNext) and the list instead of array was stupid, it make the explanation harder, adds nothing and the code was wrong. Thanks a lot. –  Julien Roncaglia Jan 17 '12 at 9:51

One way that you could eagerly evaluate a deferred execution IEnumerable is to simply turn it into an array using linq's .ToArray() function.

var evaluated = enumerable.ToArray();

This forces evaluation of the full enumerable and then you have the array that you can do whatever you want with.

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Ho Joel Martinez , thanks a lot for your answer. –  babu M Mar 26 '10 at 2:45
    
Not so fast! This won't work for relational data. –  Peder Rice Mar 28 '10 at 6:54
    
What does relational data have to do with eagerly evaluating an ienumerable? even if the ienumerable is against something like linq2sql or ef, it will iterate all records into memory (which lets you close the db connection early). –  Joel Martinez Mar 28 '10 at 21:30

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