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I have the following property

public MyType MyProperty {get;set;}

I want to change this property so that if the value is null, it'll populate the value first, and then return it... but without using a private member variable.

For instance, if I was doing this:

public MyType MyProperty 
{
    get
    {
        if (_myProperty != null)
            return _myProperty
        else
           _myProperty = XYZ;
            return _myProperty;
    }
    set
    {
        _myProperty = value;
    }
}

is this possible? Or do I need the member variable to get it done?

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3  
No. You can't have your cake and eat it too. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Mar 25 '10 at 14:33
    
without a [private] member variable... You lost me! Other than relying on some global/external feed of sorts, a property needs some variable(s) where to store its state. –  mjv Mar 25 '10 at 14:38
    
@mjv: No, that is, not explicitly. With automatic properties (like in the first code snippet) the compiler generates the private field for you. –  Thomas Mar 25 '10 at 14:41
    
@Thomas: I realize this. The point I'm trying to make is whether implicitly supplied by the compiler or explicitly declared in the code, some variable(s) is (are) needed to implement any property which "directly" conveys a [internal] state. The "diretcly" and "internal" parts of the statement edge for properties which merely provide some computation based on other properties/variables/states or which access global variables/services to fetch and/or store their "value". –  mjv Mar 25 '10 at 15:18

10 Answers 10

up vote 15 down vote accepted

You need a member variable and a full property declaration. Automatically implemented properties are only applicable if they're trivial wrappers around a field, with no logic involved. You can simplify your getter code slightly, btw:

get
{
    if (_myProperty == null)
    {
       _myProperty = XYZ;
    }
    return _myProperty;
}

(Note that none of this is thread-safe without extra locking, but I assume that's okay.)

By the way, you already have a private member variable if you're using automatically implemented properties - it's just that the compiler's generating it for you.

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The funny thing is, a few weeks after posting the question I read your explanation of automatic properties in C# in Depth :-) Thanks Jon, keep up the good work! –  DaveDev Apr 30 '10 at 21:44

The best thing you can do is to give it a value in the constructor. I know that this way you lose the "lazy loading", but you can't have auto properties and lazy loading at the same time.

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4  
Even if it's given a value in the constructor, it could (currently) still be set to null elsewhere. It may be more appropriate to make sure the value is set in the constructor, but that's really about the semantics of the property rather than the code used to implement it. –  Jon Skeet Mar 25 '10 at 14:35
    
@Jon : Good point. So make the setter never allow the property to be null :) –  galford13x Mar 25 '10 at 14:38
    
@galford13x: that would also deprive you of the ability to use auto properties, tho –  David Hedlund Mar 25 '10 at 14:39
    
@galford13x ... and never, ever, EVER, EVER, use the field directly. This is one of the reason I'd like to have the property braces introduce scope, so we could have "property-private fields". –  R. Martinho Fernandes Mar 25 '10 at 14:40
    
@David: Ah yes, I lost track of the purpose. –  galford13x Mar 25 '10 at 14:41

You're code:

public MyType MyProperty {get;set;}

refer to "Automatic Properties", that are just "syntactic sugar", as you can check out here.

The compiler generates the field for the property and also generates the code in the get set to point to the field.

internal class ClassName
{
    // Fields
    [CompilerGenerated]
    private MyType <Property>k__BackingField;

    // Properties
    public MyType MyProperty
    {
        [CompilerGenerated]
        get
        {
            return this.<Property>k__BackingField;
        }
        [CompilerGenerated]
        set
        {
            this.<Property>k__BackingField = value;
        }
    }
}

So, your code will always be backed by a compiler generated field.

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return _myProperty?? (_myProperty = XYZ);
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Not very good. If XYZ is actually: FarFarAwayServer.DoReallyLongCalculation() you will suffer a lot. You probably meant: return _myProperty ?? (_myProperty = XYZ);. I don't like it, though. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Mar 25 '10 at 14:39
    
Yes, i mean (_myProperty = XYZ). Thanks. But in case of FarFarAwayServer.DoReallyLongCalculation() it will suffer for other ways too, right? –  malay Mar 25 '10 at 14:43
    
Sure, but only once. Your original code would suffer all the time. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Mar 25 '10 at 14:43
    
yep. thats true. It would. –  malay Mar 25 '10 at 14:45

You're going to need a private variable to implement this because you have logic in your getter/setters.

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If you wish to do any embellishment on the getting or setting behavior of a property, then you will lose the compiler-generated storage location, so you'll have to store the value somewhere yourself. A private member variable makes the most sense, most of the time.

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You need the member variable to get it done:

public class MyClass
{
    MyType _myProperty = null;

    public MyType MyProperty
    {    
        get
        {
            if(_myProperty == null)
                _myProperty = XYZ;

            return _myProperty;
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
What part of «without using a private member variable» does your solution consider? –  XpiritO Mar 25 '10 at 14:36
1  
The part whre I say that you need a private member variable because Auto Properties doesn't support what he wants to do. –  Justin Niessner Mar 25 '10 at 14:37
    
was that in the original post? Don't think so... –  XpiritO Mar 25 '10 at 14:43
1  
@XpiritO: "No, you can't" is a valid answer to "Is it possible?". I don't see the problem. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Mar 25 '10 at 14:46
    
@Martinho I was referring to Justin's post (this one). But I was just making an observation, I'm not here to criticise. –  XpiritO Mar 25 '10 at 14:51

By "member variable" I assume you mean a variable defined within the property get. Yes, you certainly don't need a locally defined variable. The more common pattern, which saves a copule lines of code, is:

    if (_myProperty == null)
        _myProperty = XYZ;

    return _myProperty;

If by "member variable" you mean a backing field, then yes, you do need one. Only the completely simple "pass through" field/property relationship can be implemented without explicitly creating a backing field. (And even then, it's get's created by the compiler.) To instantiate-if-null, you need to explicitly define it.

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Yes it's possible. But you have to implement it yourself, not with auto properties. Your properties do not necessarily need to only work with member variables though that is the default.

Remember that properties are actually turned into Getter and Setter methods and you can do a lot of work within their scope. Though this practice is usually discouraged. Good practices states that property access ought to be quick and not block the client code for long perieds of time.

You could simply do this:

public MyType MyProperty 
{
    get
    {
        if (_myProperty != null)
            return _myProperty
        else
            return XYZ;
    }
    set
    {
        _myProperty = value;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
How is it possible? –  galford13x Mar 25 '10 at 14:36

Only when you use a member variable.

Usually, I combine lazy loading with the implementation of IDisposable, so that any variables that need to be cleaned up can be handled in the Dispose method.

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