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I'm struggling to find the best approach to running multiple OS commands in parallel and being able to capture the output from them. The OS command is a semi-long running proprietary utility written in C. (running on solaris/linux hosts and using python 2.4) From a high level, this script will pull jobs from a job queue, instantiate a class for each job, wherein the class then spawns the OS utility with provided arguments. There is actually going to be a lot more to this class but just focusing on the overall architecture of the script, the omitted code is trivial in this context.

There are actually 2 points where I need the output from this OS command.

When the command is first executed it returns a jobid, which I need to capture. The command then blocks until complete. I then need to capture the return code of this command.

What I really want to do (I think) is define a class which spawns a thread and then executes Popen().

Here is what I have now:

#!/usr/bin/python
import sys, subprocess, threading

cmd = "/path/to/utility -x arg1 -y arg2"

class Command(object):
    def __init__(self, cmd):
        self.cmd        = cmd
        self.process    = None
        self.returncode = None
        self.jobid      = None
    def __call__(self):
        print "Starting job..."
        self.process = subprocess.Popen(self.cmd, stdout=subprocess.PIPE, stderr=subprocess.PIPE, shell=True)
        out, err = self.process.communicate()
        self.jobid = out.split()[10]

    def alive(self):
        if self.process.poll():
            return True
        else:
            return False

    def getJobID(self):
        return self.jobid


job = Command(cmd)
jobt = threading.Thread(target=job, args=[])
jobt.start()


# if job.alive():
#    print "Job is still alive."
     # do something
# else:
#    print "Job is not alive."
     # do something else

sys.exit(0)

The problem here is using p.communicate() causes the entire thread to block and I can't get the jobid at the point I want to.

Also if I uncomment the if statement, It complains that there is no method alive().

I've tried various variations of this, like creating the thread inside of the call method of the class but that seemed like I was going down the wrong road.

I also tried specifying the class name as the target argument when spawning the thread:

jobt = threading.Thread(target=Command, args=[cmd])
jobt.start()

Every approach I have used I kept hitting roadblocks.

Thx for any suggestions.

So after trying dano's idea, I now have this:

class Command(threading.Thread):

    def __init__(self, cmd):
        super(Command, self).__init__()
        self.cmd        = cmd
        self.process    = None
        self.returncode = None
        self.jobid      = None

    def run(self):
        print "Starting job..."
        self.process = subprocess.Popen(self.cmd, stdout=subprocess.PIPE, stderr=subprocess.PIPE, bufsize=0, shell=False) 
        print "Getting job id..."
        out = self.process.stdout.readline()
        print "out=" + out
       self.returncode = self.process.wait()
    def alive(self):
        if self.process.poll():
            return True
        else:
            return False
    def getJobID(self):
        return self.jobid

job = Command(cmd)
job.start()

Which yields this following output:

Starting job...
Getting job id...

At this point it hangs until the OS command completes.

Here is an example of running this command manually. The first two lines of output return immediately.

$ /path/to/my/command -x arg1 -y arg2
  Info: job request 1 (somestring) submitted; job id is 729.
  Info: waiting for job completion
  # here is hangs until the job is complete
  Info: job 729 completed successfully

Thx again for the help.

share|improve this question
up vote 1 down vote accepted

I think you could simplify things by having Command inherit from threading.Thread:

import sys
import subprocess
import threading

cmd = "/path/to/utility -x arg1 -y arg2"

class Command(threading.Thread):
    def __init__(self, cmd):
        super(Command, self).__init__()
        self.cmd = cmd
        self.process = None
        self.returncode = None
        self.jobid = None

    def run(self):
        print "Starting job..."
        self.process = subprocess.Popen(self.cmd, stdout=subprocess.PIPE, 
                                        stderr=subprocess.PIPE, shell=True)
        out, err = self.process.communicate()
        self.jobid = out.split()[10]

    def alive(self):
        if self.process.poll():
            return True
        else:
            return False

    def getJobID(self):
        return self.jobid


job = Command(cmd)
job.start()

if job.alive():
   print "Job is still alive."
else:
   print "Job is not alive."

sys.exit(0)

You can't use self.process.communicate() to get the job id prior to the command actually exiting, becausecommunicate() will block until the program completes. Instead, you'd need to use read directly from the process' stdout:

self.process = subprocess.Popen(self.cmd, stdout=subprocess.PIPE, 
                                stderr=subprocess.PIPE, bufsize=0, shell=True)
out = self.process.stdout.readline()
self.jobid = out.split()[10]

Note that bufsize=0 is added, so try to avoid the subprocess buffering its output, which could make readline block.

Then you can call communicate or wait to wait for the process to end:

self.returncode = self.process.wait()
share|improve this answer
    
It is complaining "AttributeError: 'Command' object has no attribute '_lock'". I then changed this to "self.Lock()" and get the same error. What exactly is the point of using lock here? Thx. – BenH Aug 6 '14 at 17:11
    
@BenH Sorry, that's a copy and paste error. Fixed now. – dano Aug 6 '14 at 17:13
    
I like this approach, however "out = self.process.stdout.readline()" seems to block as well: – BenH Aug 6 '14 at 17:23
    
@BenH You can't add it as a comment. You'd have to edit it into your question. – dano Aug 6 '14 at 17:25
    
@BenH Yeah, it's a little bit awkward. Usually askers add a new section at the end of the original question marked with something like Edit:. – dano Aug 6 '14 at 17:26

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