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The following code doesnt code doesn't give any error

#include<stdio.h>
main()
{
    char c='c';
    //*c='a';
    printf("\n%c\n",c);
}

But the following code gives a warning and gives no output

#include<stdio.h>
main()
{
    char *c='c';
    //*c='a';
    printf("\n%c\n",*c);
}

test.c:4:10: warning: initialization makes pointer from integer without a cast [enabled by default]

Can anyone explain why this happens?

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1  
c is a pointer. 'c' is a char. char *c='c'; --> bad karma. Use char *c= "c"; printf("\n%s\n",c); instead. – chux Aug 6 '14 at 17:05
    
well, because a char is not the same things as a char *? – The Paramagnetic Croissant Aug 6 '14 at 17:05
    
char *c should point to a valid memory address if you want to use *c (which yields a memory access operation). The value of 'c' (typically 99) is most likely not a valid memory address in your program. – barak manos Aug 6 '14 at 17:06
1  
@user567879: I think that's chux's way of saying "undefined behavior". – Fred Larson Aug 6 '14 at 17:10
3  
You need to get a decent C primer and start reading. This question and hundreds more will be answered for you in the first couple of chapters. – Carey Gregory Aug 6 '14 at 17:20
up vote 3 down vote accepted

In order to understand what is happening, it is necessary to understand the difference between 'c' and "c" literals (constants):

  • Character literal 'c' is a numeric constant, a shorthand to writing (char)99 (assuming ASCII encoding)
  • String literal "c" represents an address of a two-character sequence {'c', '\0'}

Had you used "c" instead of 'c', your second code snippet would have worked. You need to assign an address to char*, and "c" gives you an address. However, 'c' is not an address, it's a numeric constant. That's why you get a warning.

When you dereference a constant 'c' re-interpreted as a pointer, you get undefined behavior. That is why printf does not print anything.

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char *c='c';
//*c='a';
printf("\n%c\n",*c);

You're trying to declare a pointer c by char *c;

Pointer is a variable which holds the memory location of another variable,so

char *c='c';

doesn't makes any sense a pointer can hold hold the address of a memory locat

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Types matter.

In the first snippet, the type of the variable c is char, which is an integral type. The expression 'c' has type int, and its value is whatever code is used for the character 'c' (in ASCII, it would be 99). The types int and char are compatible; you can assign one to the other without needing a cast, assuming the value is representable in the target type. In this case, the value of 'c' is representable in an object of type char.

In the second snippet, the type of c is char *, which is a pointer type. Pointer types and integral types are not compatible, and you can't assign one to the other without a cast, which is why you got the diagnostic. The wrong way to fix it would be

char *c = (char *) 'c';

which takes the value of the expression 'c' (99), converts it to a pointer type, and assigns the resulting pointer value to c. This is the wrong way to fix it because the resulting pointer value is most likely not a valid address.

What you probably meant to do was something along the lines of

char *c = "c"; // note double quotes

The expressiuon "c" is a string literal; it is a 2-element array of char containing the values {'c', 0 }. Under most circumstances, an expression of type "N-element array of T" will be converted ("decay") to an expression of type "pointer to T", and the value of the expression will be the address of the first element in the array. So in the declaration above, the address of the first character of the string literal "c" is assigned to the pointer variable c.

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