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I was wondering how people deal with graph theory in python? How is a graph stored? Are there libraries for this?

For example how would I input a graph and then find its Chromatic polynomial? Or its girth? Or the number of unique spanning trees? How about problems that involve edge weight like salesman problems?

I don't need all of these answered, I'm just looking for a method or tool set that will be able to help me approach solve problems like this.

Thanks, Dan

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6 Answers

up vote 20 down vote accepted

this might help - http://wiki.python.org/moin/PythonGraphApi. From the page and quick lookaround, python-graph seems pretty mature.

  • Support for directed, undirected, weighted and non-weighted graphs
  • Support for hypergraphs
  • Canonical operations
  • XML import and export
  • DOT-Language import and export (for usage with Graphviz)
  • Random graph generation
  • Accessibility (transitive closure)
  • Breadth-first search
  • Critical path algorithm
  • Cut-vertex and cut-edge identification
  • Cycle detection
  • Depth-first search
  • Heuristic search (A* algorithm)
  • Identification of connected components
  • Maximum-flow / Minimum-cut (Edmonds-Karp algorithm)
  • Minimum spanning tree (Prim's algorithm)
  • Mutual-accessibility (strongly connected components)
  • Shortest path search (Dijkstra's algorithm)
  • Shortest path search (Bellman-Ford algorithm)
  • Topological sorting
  • Transitive edge identification
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networkx

Features

Standard graph-theoretic and statistical physics functions
Easy exchange of network algorithms between applications, disciplines, and platforms
Many classic graphs and synthetic networks
Nodes and edges can be "anything" (e.g. time-series, text, images, XML records)
Exploits existing code from high-quality legacy software in C, C++, Fortran, etc.
Open source (encourages community input)
Unit-tested

Additional benefits from Python

Fast prototyping of new algorithms
Easy to teach
Multi-platform
Allows easy access to almost any database

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There is a wonderful article http://www.python.org/doc/essays/graphs/

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I would like to shamelessly plug my own python graph library: graph-tool.

It is very fast, since it is implemented in C++ with the Boost Graph Library, and it contains lots of algorithms and extensive documentation.

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You can also have a look at NetworkX which has pretty advanced algorithms & drawing capability for graphs !

From the web site :

Features

* Standard graph-theoretic and statistical physics functions
* Easy exchange of network algorithms between applications, disciplines, and platforms
* Many classic graphs and synthetic networks
* Nodes and edges can be "anything" (e.g. time-series, text, images, XML records)
* Exploits existing code from high-quality legacy software in C, C++, Fortran, etc.
* Open source (encourages community input)
* Unit-tested
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There's also igraph, which is a library primarily implemented in C (hence it is usually faster than pure Python solutions), with a higher level interface to Python. Therefore, you get the best of both worlds: the speed of a pure C solution and all the usual benefits (fast prototyping etc.) of Python.

An example with igraph:

>>> from igraph import Graph
>>> g = Graph.Famous("petersen")
>>> g.girth()
5

Disclaimer: I'm a co-developer of igraph, so I'm not totally impartial :)

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