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I am working on an exercise where I have two arrays of hashes of grocery store items. I am prompting the user with "What food item are you looking for?" I am trying to take the user's answer, and determine:

if - their response is in array of hashes #1, do something
elsif - their response is in array of hashes #2, do something
else - do something

I can't get this to work. No matter what user input I type in, I get the response from the first if statement, "I found your item on the grocery list."

Here are the hashes, arrays, and code (that is not working):

milk    = {:item => "milk",    :aisle => 15, :price => 3.29}
grapes  = {:item => "grapes",  :aisle => 1,  :price => 7.99}
eggs    = {:item => "eggs",    :aisle => 12, :price => 1.95}  
peanuts = {:item => "peanuts", :aisle => 17, :price => 5.98} 


grocery_list = [milk, grapes, eggs]
grocery_cart = [peanuts]  



def is_item_on_grocery_list?(list)
  list.each do |food|
    food[:item] == @choice
  end
end

def is_item_on_grocery_cart?(cart)
  cart.each do |food|
    food[:item] == @choice
  end
end


puts "Type an item from your Grocery List to find out what aisle it is on: "
print "> "
@choice = $stdin.gets.chomp.downcase.strip


if is_item_on_grocery_list?(grocery_list)
  puts "I found your item on the grocery list."
elsif is_item_on_grocery_cart?(grocery_cart)
  puts "Your item is already in your cart."
else puts "Your item is not on either list."
end 

Thank you.

share|improve this question
    
I suggest using the any? method instead of each for something like this. –  Justin Wood Aug 7 at 1:30
    
What is your question? –  sawa Aug 7 at 1:44
    
Using the any? method worked. Thanks @JustinWood! –  HPJAJ Aug 7 at 2:26

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Justin, yes, replacing each with any? fixes the problem, but there are a few other problems with your code that you should know about.

Firstly, your two methods are functionally identical. Yes, you have given the methods and the block variables different names, but they do the same thing. You can confirm that by calling either of them twice, once passing the argument grocery_list and once with argument grocery_cart.

Secondly, you can make your method is_item_on_grocery_list? potentially more versatile by passing the value of @choice as a parameter, rather than hardwiring it in. So consider writing it like this:

milk    = {:item => "milk",    :aisle => 15, :price => 3.29}
grapes  = {:item => "grapes",  :aisle => 1,  :price => 7.99}
eggs    = {:item => "eggs",    :aisle => 12, :price => 1.95}  
peanuts = {:item => "peanuts", :aisle => 17, :price => 5.98} 

grocery_list = [milk, grapes, eggs]
grocery_cart = [peanuts]

def item_present?(arr, item)
  arr.any? do |food|
    food[:item] == item
  end
end

puts "Type an item from your Grocery List to find out what aisle it is on: "
print "> "
choice = gets.chomp.downcase.strip

if item_present?(grocery_list, choice)
  puts "I found your item on the grocery list."
elsif item_present?(grocery_cart, choice)
  puts "Your item is already in your cart."
else puts "Your item is not on either list."
end 

Suppose the user were to enter "eggs". This would print, "I found your item on the grocery list.", which is fine, but suppose you also wanted to tell the person the aisle that egges are in. One way you could do that would be to change item_present? to this:

def item_present?(arr, item)
  arr.any? do |food|
    (food[:item] == item) ? food[:aisle] : false
  end
end

That is, rather than returning true or false, it would return either the aisle (which is a truthy value) or false. This is rather messy, however, so maybe consider using a different data structure. Here is one possibility:

food = { "milk"    => { :loc => :list, :aisle => 15, :price => 3.29},
         "grapes"  => { :loc => :list, :aisle => 1,  :price => 7.99},
         "eggs"    => { :loc => :list, :aisle => 12, :price => 1.95},
         "peanuts" => { :loc => :cart, :aisle => 17, :price => 5.98}
       } 

def item_present?(food, type, item)
  food.any? { |f| food.key?(item) && food[item][:loc] == type }
end

puts "Type an item from your Grocery List to find out what aisle it is on: "
print "> "
choice = gets.chomp.downcase.strip

if item_present?(food, :list, choice)
  puts "I found your item on the grocery list. Try aisle #{food[choice][:aisle]}"
elsif item_present?(food, :cart, choice)
  puts "Your item is already in your cart.  Are you blind?"
else puts "Your item is not on your list or in your cart."
end

Now if the user enters "eggs", the following is printed:

"I found your item on the grocery list. Try aisle 12"
share|improve this answer
    
Great ideas. Appreciate all the information. Thanks @CarySwoveland! –  HPJAJ Aug 7 at 19:23

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