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So I'm creating a spiral matrix using C#.

A spiral array is a square arrangement of the first N^2 natural numbers, where the numbers increase sequentially as you go around the edges of the array spiralling inwards.

For example:

enter image description here

I'm supposed to do this using an algorithm however my final results look like this:

enter image description here enter image description here

My code is below:

    private static void FillMatrix (int[ , ] matrix, int n)
    {
        int positionX = 0;
        int positionY = 0;

        int direction = 0; // The initial direction is "right"
        int stepsCount = n - 1; // stepsCount decrements after 3/2/2/2/2...
        int stepPosition = 0; // 0 steps already performed
        int counter = 1; // counter increments after every turn

        for (int i = 1; i < n * n; i++)
        {
            matrix[positionY, positionX] = i;

            //moving logic:

            if (stepPosition < stepsCount)
            {
                stepPosition++;
            }
            else
            {
                counter++;
                stepPosition = 1;

                if (counter <= 3)
                {
                    direction = (direction + 1) % 4;
                }

                else if (counter % 2 != 0 && counter >= 5 || counter == 4)
                {
                    stepsCount = stepsCount - 1;
                    direction = (direction + 1) % 4;
                }
            }


            // Move to the next cell in the current direction
            switch (direction)
            {
                case 0:
                    // right
                    positionX++;
                    break;
                case 1:
                    // down
                    positionY++;
                    break;
                case 2:
                    // left
                    positionX--;
                    break;
                case 3:
                    // up
                    positionY--;
                    break;
            }
        }
    }

    private static void PrintMatrix (int[ , ] matrix, int n)
    {
        for (int i = 0; i < n; i++)
        {
            for (int j = 0; j < n; j++)
            {
                Console.Write("{0,3}", matrix[i, j]);
            }
            Console.WriteLine();
        }
    }

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        int n;

        Console.WriteLine("Please enter N: ");
        bool checkN = int.TryParse(Console.ReadLine(), out n);

        if (checkN)
        {
            int[,] spiralMatrix = new int[n,n];

            FillMatrix(spiralMatrix, n);

            PrintMatrix(spiralMatrix, n);
        }

        Console.ReadKey();
    }
}

}

Any help much appreciated!

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Start at 0, not 1, to fix the obvious off-by-one. Other numbers (20, 21, 22) in the output appear misplaced due to incorrect width/right-side clamping, which overwrites previous values and leaves some unfilled spaces the end. –  user2864740 Aug 7 at 2:36

2 Answers 2

Your logic for deciding when to make a turn and how many steps to take has a bug, and it is more complicated than necessary. A better way of making a decision on when to turn is to check the matrix itself. Pre-fill the matrix with -1, then start filling it at the top-left corner. When you see -1, continue straight; if you reached one of the ends of the matrix, or the next position has -1 in it, then make a turn. This makes your stepPosition and stepCount variables unnecessary, and shortens your code quite a bit.

Another useful trick is turning right: rather than keeping a direction as a single variable, keep two "delta" variables - dx and dy

if (positionX < 0 || positionX == n || positionY < 0 || positionY == N || matrix[positionX][positionY] != -1) {
    int temp = dy;
    dy = dx;
    dx = -temp;
}
positionX += dx;
positionY += dy;
share|improve this answer
    
Simply look up zero may get trouble. As in the example, the top left corner is zero. –  hk6279 Aug 7 at 2:47
    
@hk6279 I see - I didn't notice the example, looking at the mistakes in the middle of OP's output. I edited the answer to use -1 instead. Thanks! –  dasblinkenlight Aug 7 at 2:51
    
Thanks guys, I appreciate the help but the problem was with my algorithm and not my method. My mistakes may have not made the question clear to you so I apologize for that. My working solution is in this post as an answer for you to look at. –  Haxxx Aug 8 at 1:24
up vote 0 down vote accepted

I've solved this problem.

There was an issue with my algorithm. The number pattern for the size of sequential line when filling in a matrix from the outside in is N, N-1, N-1, N-2, N-2, N-3, N-3... and so on.

For example in a spiral matrix of N size 4 the pattern goes like this:

4 right. 3 down. 3 left. 2 up. 2 right. 1 down. 1 left.

I originally thought the pattern started:

3 right. 3 down. 3 left.

I forgot to include the one more element of movement resulting in a algorithm that wouldn't fill out correctly.

Once I changed my conditional statements to the following code it allowed for the correct output. To clarify I am supposed to be starting from 1 in my 0 element of the array. Apologies for the confusion.

Code below:

            int positionX = 0;
            int positionY = 0;

            int direction = 0; // The initial direction is "right"
            int stepsCount = n - 1; // stepsCount decrements after 1/2/2/2/2... turns
            int stepPosition = 1; // 1 steps already performed
            int counter = 0; // counter increments after every change in direction

            for (int i = 1; i < n * n + 1; i++)
            {
                matrix[positionY, positionX] = i;

                //moving logic:

                if (stepPosition <= stepsCount)
                {
                    stepPosition++;
                }
                else
                {
                    counter++;
                    stepPosition = 1;

                    if (counter % 2 != 0)
                    {
                        stepsCount = stepsCount - 1;
                        direction = (direction + 1) % 4;
                    }
                    else if (counter % 2 == 0)
                    {
                        direction = (direction + 1) % 4;
                    }

                }

The result is a much simpler way than checking for zero and turning based on that rule as it is absolutely infallable.

Example results below:

enter image description here enter image description here

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