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I got a global property i want to be able to access from within multiple places of my solution. I have a ViewModel similar like this:

    public class GlobalSettingsViewModel : ViewModelBase
    {
    /// Bool is true if simple mode is activated        
    private bool isSimpleModeActive;

    /// <summary>
    /// Gets the IsSimpleModeActive property
    /// </summary>
    public bool IsSimpleModeActive
    {
        get
        {
            return isSimpleModeActive;
        }
        set
        {
            if (isSimpleModeActive == value) { return; }
            isSimpleModeActive = value;
            RaisePropertyChanged("IsSimpleModeActive");
        }
    }   

Now I'm wondering if it is possible to add to my app.xaml a ResourceDictionary in order to be able to access the property of this viewmodel from multiple places without having to pass it all the way through.

<Application x:Class="AcpCommander.App"
         xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation"
         xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml"
         StartupUri="MainWindow.xaml">
<Application.Resources>
    <ResourceDictionary... />
</Application.Resources>

And Then how would i bind the property to my view? Right now I'm having a checkbox bound to a bool like this:

<CheckBox Grid.Row="0"
                              Content="Activate simple mode"                                 
                              IsChecked="{Binding IsSimpleModeActive}" /> 

How will a bind to a property of a resource of the app.xaml? Thanks for all help.

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Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise... as such I have voted to close this question. In short though, no, it is not a good idea, but you seem to be confusing a view model with a state manager. You don't need a view model to save application state... you probably need some kind of singleton class that is accessible from a view model. –  Sheridan Aug 7 at 7:58

2 Answers 2

Take a look at MVVM light.

In the app.xaml it declares a resource of type ViewModelLocator. This object exposes properties to access various ViewModels in a global fashion. Since it's a resource you can bind to it from xaml files.

<Grid DataContext={Binding Path=MyViewModel, Source={StaticResource ViewModelLocator}}
      ...more here...>

It will also use dependency injection but that's optional and you don't have to worry about it if you don't know what it is (but i would strongly recommend to learn about it).

Actually there's no problem using resources to expose your VMs.

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Now I'm wondering if it is possible to add to my app.xaml a ResourceDictionary in order to be able to access the property of this viewmodel from multiple places without having to pass it all the way through.

You can do it, it is generally a bad idea unless you really know what you're doing. (The way you would bind to it is using Source=StaticResource, as in IsChecked="{Binding Source={StaticResource GlobalSettingsViewModel},Path=IsSimpleModeActive}" />.) It's the same problems associated with global variables -- you can quickly lose control of the scope and lifetime of other objects that reference the globals; you lose encapsulation; you can easily introduce memory leaks.

So, best avoided -- I agree with @Sheridan, you should expose the various settings in each view-model, as needed. Then from the view-model, reference the settings. You can do this by using a global/static, although you run some of the same risks; I would recommend injecting a settings wrapper class into the view-models that need access. This may be a bit more work up-front, but will hopefully save some headaches in the long run.

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