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After spending a very frustrating and unproductive day on this, I'm posting here in search of help.

I am using a third-party library that initiates a network connection in an unknown manner (I do know however it's a managed wrapper for an unmanaged lib). It lets you know about the status of the connection by invoking an event StatusChanged(status).

Since obviously invoking the network is costly and I may not need it for my Service, I inject an AsyncLazy<Connection> which is then invoked if necessary. The Service is accessed by ParallelForEachAsync which is an extension I made to process Tasks concurrently, based on this post.

If accessed sequentially, all is well. Any concurrency, even 2 parallel tasks will result in a deadlock 90% of the time. I know it's definitely related to how the third-party lib interacts with my code because a) I am not able to reproduce the effect using the same structure but without invoking it and b) the event StatusChanged(Connecting) is received fine, at which point I assume the network operation is started and I never get a callback for StatusChanged(Connected).

Here's a as-faithful-as-possible repro of the code structure which doesn't reproduce the deadlock unfortunately.

Any ideas on how to go about resolving this?

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        AsyncContext.Run(() => MainAsync(args));
    }

    static async Task MainAsync(string[] args)
    {
        var lazy = new AsyncLazy<Connection>(() => ConnectionFactory.Create());
        var service = new Service(lazy);

        await Enumerable.Range(0, 100)
            .ParallelForEachAsync(10, async i =>
            {
                await service.DoWork();
                Console.WriteLine("did some work");
            }, CancellationToken.None);
    }
}

class ConnectionFactory
{
    public static Task<Connection> Create()
    {
        var tcs = new TaskCompletionSource<Connection>();
        var session = new Session();

        session.Connected += (sender, args) =>
        {
            Console.WriteLine("connected");
            tcs.SetResult(new Connection());
        };

        session.Connect();

        return tcs.Task;
    }
}

class Connection
{
    public async Task DoSomethinElse()
    {
        await Task.Delay(1000);
    }
}

class Session
{
    public event EventHandler Connected;

    public void Connect()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Simulate network operation with unknown scheduling");
        Task.Delay(100).Wait();

        Connected(this, EventArgs.Empty);
    }
}

class Service
{
    private static Random r = new Random();
    private readonly AsyncLazy<Connection> lazy;

    public Service(AsyncLazy<Connection> lazy)
    {
        this.lazy = lazy;
    }

    public async Task DoWork()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Trying to do some work, will connect");
        await Task.Delay(r.Next(0, 100));
        var connection = await lazy;
        await connection.DoSomethinElse();
    }
}

public static class AsyncExtensions
{
    public static async Task<AsyncParallelLoopResult> ParallelForEachAsync<T>(
            this IEnumerable<T> source,
            int degreeOfParallelism,
            Func<T, Task> body,
            CancellationToken cancellationToken)
    {
        var partitions = Partitioner.Create(source).GetPartitions(degreeOfParallelism);

        bool wasBroken = false;
        var tasks =
            from partition in partitions
            select Task.Run(async () =>
            {
                using (partition)
                {
                    while (partition.MoveNext())
                    {
                        if (cancellationToken.IsCancellationRequested)
                        {
                            Volatile.Write(ref wasBroken, true);
                            break;
                        }

                        await body(partition.Current);
                    }
                }
            });

        await Task.WhenAll(tasks)
            .ConfigureAwait(false);

        return new AsyncParallelLoopResult(Volatile.Read(ref wasBroken));
    }
}

public class AsyncParallelLoopResult
{
    public bool IsCompleted { get; private set; }

    internal AsyncParallelLoopResult(bool isCompleted)
    {
        IsCompleted = isCompleted;
    }
}

EDIT

I think I understand why it's happening but not sure how to solve it. While the context is waiting for DoWork, DoWork is waiting for the lazy connection.

This ugly hack seems to solve it:

Connection WaitForConnection()
    {
        connectionLazy.Start();
        var awaiter = connectionLazy.GetAwaiter();
        while (!awaiter.IsCompleted)
            Thread.Sleep(50);
        return awaiter.GetResult();
    }

Any more elegant solutions?

share|improve this question
    
Why do you include the network status stuff in the parallel for each (presumably it's somewhere in service.DoWork? Don't you want to do that only once? Also, are you sure that the library is thread safe? – Marcel N. Aug 7 '14 at 8:27
    
Basically DoWork() will need data which may or may not be found in a local cache. If it's not found, it fetches it from the network. I think it is thread-safe but seems to be irrelevant since it's only invoked from one thread... – georgiosd Aug 7 '14 at 8:56
    
You do have a ParallelForEachAsync which spawns multiple tasks, each calling service.DoWork (possibly) in parallel. That does not make it single-threaded. – Marcel N. Aug 7 '14 at 8:59
    
Invoking connection methods in parallel works just fine. Connecting doesn't. i.e. if you take out the lazy initialization and just start the connection before the parallel loop, it'll work as expected. – georgiosd Aug 7 '14 at 9:02
    
I visited the link you mentioned but did not find ParallelForEachAsync there. – avo Aug 7 '14 at 12:41
up vote 1 down vote accepted

I suspect that the 3rd-party library is requiring some kind of STA pumping. This is fairly common with old-style asynchronous code.

I have a type AsyncContextThread that you can try, passing true to the constructor to enable manual STA pumping. AsyncContextThread is just like AsyncContext except it runs the context within a new thread (an STA thread in this case).

static void Main(string[] args)
{
  using (var thread = new AsyncContextThread(true))
  {
    thread.Factory.Run(() => MainAsync(args)).Wait();
  }
}

or

static void Main(string[] args)
{
  AsyncContext.Run(() => async
  {
    using (var thread = new AsyncContextThread(true))
    {
      await thread.Factory.Run(() => MainAsync(args));
    }
  }
}

Note that AsyncContextThread will not work in all STA scenarios. I have run into issues when doing (some rather twisted) COM interop that required a true UI thread (WPF or WinForms thread); for some reason the STA pumping wasn't sufficient for those COM objects.

share|improve this answer
1  
Let's note that at the time of this writing, the AsyncContextThread(true) ctor appears only in the prerelease nuget! – georgiosd Aug 11 '14 at 13:20
    
True. In earlier versions, AsyncContextThread would do this thing where it would try to pump STAs automatically if it was on a platform that supported it, but it just never worked very well (especially considering cross-platform code). So in the new version it will be an explicit request. – Stephen Cleary Aug 11 '14 at 14:07
    
Great job @StephenCleary, thanks for an excellent nuget – georgiosd Aug 12 '14 at 13:46

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