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I've heard a lot about IMS during these last months, but the more I read, the less I understand what it is about. The wikipedia page is too complex for me, and the other papers or news I found on the subject sounded heavily bullshit.

So what is it exactly? What does it involve on the technical level (software and/or hardware)?
Finally, what does it mean for me as a VoIP developper, but also as a softphone end user?

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This certainly deserves to receive some ims tag but I don't have the right to create it. –  Anto Aug 7 at 12:43

1 Answer 1

  1. So what is it exactly?

    • Simply, it is a way to make a call from any kinds of your PDA (Mobile phone, PC, laptop) through NETWORK OPERATOR SERVER by any kinds of WIRELESS connection (wifi, 4G, wimax, NO NEED TO USE INTERNET CONNECTION) to others PDA(mobile phone, PC, laptop)
    • It is different with OTT apps (as Skype, Whatsapp, viber...) at: OTT apps use internet connection, IMS does not.
    • It is the same with OTT apps at: they are all using IP as the address to connect to each end user device.
  2. What does it involve on the technical level (software and/or hardware)?

    • The first answer has revealed that: not only software, hardware, but IMS needs to be involved in new protocols to connect client to server, and client to client, also new APIs for User devices.
  3. Finally, what does it mean for me as a VoIP developper, but also as a softphone end user?
    • The answer is it is a potentially golden mine. The things that IMS gets over the recently normal connection is that it uses IP connections, which means the call will be better at voice quality, reducing delay time, support geographic determining, and so on.

Hope it helps. Share to be shared. ;)

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