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From a Console Application project in Visual Studio, I want to redirect Console's output to the Output Window while debugging.

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6 Answers 6

up vote 23 down vote accepted

Change application type to Windows before debugging. Without Console window, Console.WriteLine works like Trace.WriteLine. Don't forget to reset application back to Console type after debugging.

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Ah, that's right. I knew it was something easy. I must have done this at least five times. –  AMissico Mar 25 '10 at 19:39
    
I forgot, Alex Farber, YOUR AWESOME! –  AMissico Mar 25 '10 at 19:43
    
Moreover, don't forget to remove the System.Windows.Forms reference that is added when changing the project type. –  AMissico Mar 27 '10 at 16:53
1  
"Don't forget to reset application back to Console type after debugging." I just did. LOL –  AMissico Mar 27 '10 at 18:19
    class DebugWriter : TextWriter
    {        
        public override void WriteLine(string value)
        {
            Debug.WriteLine(value);
            base.WriteLine(value);
        }

        public override void Write(string value)
        {
            Debug.Write(value);
            base.Write(value);
        }

        public override Encoding Encoding
        {
            get { return Encoding.Unicode; }
        }
    }

    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
#if DEBUG         
            if (Debugger.IsAttached)
                Console.SetOut(new DebugWriter());   
#endif

            Console.WriteLine("hi");
        }
    }

** note that this is roughed together almost pseudo code. it works but needs work :) **

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The problem with this approach is 1) it is code based 2) the output is not the same, and 3) a console window is still opened. –  AMissico Mar 25 '10 at 19:42
    
How does the output differ? –  dkackman Mar 25 '10 at 20:12
    
I do not remember specifically, but I was missing new lines. Probably because Console.WriteLine() use. –  AMissico Mar 25 '10 at 20:48
1  
There was a bug where the WriteLine overload was using Debug.Write instead of Debug.WriteLine. I've edited. –  dkackman Mar 25 '10 at 21:01

You can change it to System.Diagnostics.Debug.Write();

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Note if you're using dkackman's method but you want to write the output to BOTH the console window and the debug window, then you can slightly modify his code like this:

class DebugWriter : TextWriter
{
    //save static reference to stdOut
    static TextWriter stdOut = Console.Out;

    public override void WriteLine(string value)
    {
        Debug.WriteLine(value);
        stdOut.WriteLine(value);
        base.WriteLine(value);
    }

    public override void Write(string value)
    {
        Debug.Write(value);
        stdOut.Write(value);
        base.Write(value);
    }

    public override Encoding Encoding
    {
        get { return Encoding.Unicode; }
    }
}
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Try Trace.Write and use DebugView

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Actually, there is an easiest way: In the "Options" window of Visual Studio (from the Tools menu), go to "Debugging" then check the option "Redirect All Output Window Text to the Immediate Window".

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6  
That doesn't work at all. –  Pieter Müller May 10 '12 at 14:27
    
ctrl-alt-I brings up the intermediate window, but yeah it shows as empty. –  barlop Aug 2 '14 at 7:04

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