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I'm using a loop within my main function that looks like this:

while (1)
{
cout << "Hello world" << endl;
}

How would I go about pausing this loop and resume while a key is pressed? For example: When I hold [TAB] down, the loop runs. And when I let go, the loop pauses again.

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duplicate of "wait for user input" – CashCow Aug 7 '14 at 16:08
    
doesn't it take 5 users to close as a duplicate anymore? – CashCow Aug 7 '14 at 16:10
1  
@CashCow I disagree with the duplicate, the use wants to loop while the TAB key is pressed, which can't be done in standard C. – Joachim Pileborg Aug 7 '14 at 16:10
1  
@CashCow If you use e.g. getchar then the input have to be ended by a newline before the program can read the input. – Joachim Pileborg Aug 7 '14 at 16:13
2  
Instead of _getch, I'd recommend ReadConsoleInput. – chris Aug 7 '14 at 16:15

You can use the function GetAsyncKeyState()

Here is an adaptation that does what you describe:
EDITED to allow exit of loop when SHIFT key is hit.

#include <stdio.h> //Use these includes: (may be different on your environment) 
#include <windows.h>

BOOL isKeyDown(int key)  ;
int main(void)
{
    int running = 1;
    while(running)
    {
        while(!isKeyDown(VK_TAB)); //VK_TAB & others defined in WinUser.h
        printf("Hello World");
        Delay(1.0);
        if(isKeyDown(VK_SHIFT)) running = 0;//<SHIFT> exits loop
    }

    return 0;   
}


BOOL isKeyDown(int key)
{
    int i;
    short res;

    res = GetAsyncKeyState(key);
    if((0x80000000 &res  != 0) || (0x00000001 & res != 0)) return TRUE; 

    return FALSE;   
}
share|improve this answer
    
Hello. Thanks for trying to help out, although this doesn't really solve my problem. In this case, there's still an endless loop running, which is bad. But maybe you can't avoid this loop? – pnda Aug 7 '14 at 16:54
    
@user3052603 see my edit (in about two minutes). Will modify while(1) to while(running) – ryyker Aug 7 '14 at 16:57

I don't know if you are planning to use threads... But I came up with a solution that places the loop inside a thread and then, on the main thread, checks for the TAB key state. If the key is pressed the main thread awakes the loop thread, if it is not pressed, the main thread hangs the loop thread. Check it out:

#include<windows.h>
#include<iostream>

using namespace std;

bool running = false;

DWORD WINAPI thread(LPVOID arg)
{
    while (1)
    {
        cout << "Hello world" << endl;
    }
}

void controlThread(void)
{
    short keystate = GetAsyncKeyState(VK_TAB);
    if(!running && keystate < 0)
    {
        ResumeThread(h_thread);
        running = true;
    }
    else if(running && keystate >= 0)
    {
        SuspendThread(h_thread);
        running = false;
    }
}
int main(void)
{
    HANDLE h_thread;

    h_thread = CreateThread(NULL,0,thread,NULL,0,NULL);
    SuspendThread(h_thread);

    while(1)
    {
        controlThread();    
        //To not consume too many processing resources.
        Sleep(200);
    }
}

My main uses a loop to keep checking for the keypress forever... But you can do that on specific points of your program, avoiding that infinite loop.

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