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I'm using subprocess to run a script from within python. I tried this

option 1

password = getpass.getpass()
from subprocess import Popen, PIPE, check_call  
proc=Popen([command, option1, option2, etc...], stdin=PIPE, stdout=PIPE, stderr=PIPE)  
proc.stdin.write(password)  
proc.stdin.flush()  
stdout,stderr = proc.communicate()  
print stdout  
print stderr  

and this

option 2

password = getpass.getpass()
subprocess.call([command, option1, option2, etc..., password])

Neither of them work, that is, the password is not sent to the process. If I use option 2 and do not provide password, the subprocess asks me for it and everething works.

share|improve this question
    
You probably need to use pexpect for this. Generally you can't send passwords via stdin. –  dano Aug 7 '14 at 18:18
    
other people seem to have used it stackoverflow.com/questions/2387731/… –  Bob Aug 7 '14 at 18:19
    
Right, that's what I'm saying. All the questions asking how to send a password via stdin get answered with "use pexpect". –  dano Aug 7 '14 at 18:21
    
could you post an example with pexpect? I read the docs but I'm not sure how to translate the code above –  Bob Aug 7 '14 at 18:22
    

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Here's a very basic example of how to use pexpect for this:

import sys
import pexpect
import getpass

password = getpass.getpass("Enter password:")

child = pexpect.spawn('ssh -l root 10.x.x.x "ls /"')
i = child.expect([pexpect.TIMEOUT, "password:"])
if i == 0:
    print("Got unexpected output: %s %s" % (child.before, child.after))
    sys.exit()
else:
    child.sendline(password)
print(child.read())

Output:

Enter password:

bin
boot
dev
etc
export
home
initrd.img
initrd.img.old
lib
lib64
lost+found
media
mnt
opt
proc
root
run
sbin
selinux
srv
sys
tmp
usr
var
vmlinuz
vmlinuz.old

There are more detailed examples here.

share|improve this answer
    
keep getting "got <type 'str'> as pattern, must be one of <type 'unicode'>, pexpect.EOF, pexpect.TIMEOUT" –  Bob Aug 7 '14 at 18:39
1  
@Bob What version of Python? Try replacing "password" with u"password". –  dano Aug 7 '14 at 18:41
    
ok... so now, in my case there may be more text than just 'password'. I tried '\wpassword\w' but it gets stuck. Did I do something wrong with re? –  Bob Aug 7 '14 at 18:47
1  
@Bob in my case the text is actually "root@10.x.x.x's password:" It just looks for the provided text anywhere in the output. It still works if I just provide "passwor". –  dano Aug 7 '14 at 18:49
1  
@Bob Yeah, that's there just in case something unexpected is in the output of the command you're running, so it doesn't hang forever. (Actually, I think the command will still timeout if you don't provide it, you'll just get an exception raised) You can also provide other strings to wait for, too. The return value of the expect call will be the index in the list of the output that matched. so, 0 for TIMEOUT, 1 for password: in the above example. –  dano Aug 7 '14 at 18:51

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