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I have a compute intensive method Calculate that may run for a few seconds, requests come from multiple threads.

Only one Calculate should be executing, a subsequent request should be queued until the initial request completes. If there is already a request queued then the the subsequent request can be discarded (as the queued request will be sufficient)

There seems to be lots of potential solutions but I just need the simplest.

UPDATE: Here's my rudimentaryattempt:

private int _queueStatus;
private readonly object _queueStatusSync = new Object();

public void Calculate()
{
    lock(_queueStatusSync)
    {
        if(_queueStatus == 2) return;
        _queueStatus++;
        if(_queueStatus == 2) return;
    }
    for(;;)
    {
        CalculateImpl();
        lock(_queueStatusSync)
            if(--_queueStatus == 0) return;

    }
}

private void CalculateImpl()
{
    // long running process will take a few seconds...
}
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3 Answers 3

The simplest, cleanest solution IMO is using TPL Dataflow (as always) with a BufferBlock acting as the queue. BufferBlock is thread-safe, supports async-await, and more important, has TryReceiveAll to get all the items at once. It also has OutputAvailableAsync so you can wait asynchronously for items to be posted to the buffer. When multiple requests are posted you simply take the last and forget about the rest:

var buffer = new BufferBlock<Request>();
var task = Task.Run(async () =>
{
    while (await buffer.OutputAvailableAsync())
    {
        IList<Request> requests;
        buffer.TryReceiveAll(out requests);
        Calculate(requests.Last());
    }
});

Usage:

buffer.Post(new Request());
buffer.Post(new Request());

Edit: If you don't have any input or output for the Calculate method you can simply use a boolean to act as a switch. If it's true you can turn it off and calculate, if it became true again while Calculate was running then calculate again:

public bool _shouldCalculate;

public void Producer()
{
    _shouldCalculate = true;
}

public async Task Consumer()
{
    while (true)
    {
        if (!_shouldCalculate)
        {
            await Task.Delay(1000);
        }
        else
        {
            _shouldCalculate = false;
            Calculate();

        }
    }
}
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Calculate is currently a void method with no parameters, I can't seem to get your code to work. I'm guessing Linqpad isn't the best place to test async stuff! –  Dog Ears Aug 7 '14 at 22:16
    
@DogEars TPL Dataflow is a Nuget library, you need to add that first. But if Calculate has no input or output, there's no need for a queue. Just have a bool which is set to true on requests and set to false when you calculate. –  i3arnon Aug 7 '14 at 22:24
    
I've got the nuget package added to LinqPad.. We need to ensure that if a Calculation is in progress.. subsequent requests will get executed, so a "queue" of 1 is required I think , but it doesn't have to store anything.. just a record of the outstanding request. –  Dog Ears Aug 7 '14 at 22:27
    
@DogEars It can simply turn on that bool which represents a request to be made –  i3arnon Aug 7 '14 at 22:29
    
@l3arnon We're getting there! Currently the calculation is done synchronously on the calling thread.. i need to avoid the task.delay we could have dozens of objects that have the Calculate method. I don't really want to have to spawn a 'Consumer' for each one? Isn't this making it more complex. I've updated my rudimentary example simplifying it a bit after what you've suggested. cheers, Ears. –  Dog Ears Aug 7 '14 at 22:48

It sounds like a classic producer-consumer. I'd recommend looking into BlockingCollection<T>. It is part of the System.Collection.Concurrent namespace. On top of that you can implementvyour queueing logic.

You may supply to a BlockingCollection any internal structure to hold its data, such as a ConcurrentBag<T>, ConcurrentQueue<T> etc. The latter is the default structure used.

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A BlockingCollection that only takes 1 at a time
The trick is to skip if there are any items in the collection

I would go with the answer from I3aron +1
This is (maybe) a BlockingCollection solution

public static void BC_AddTakeCompleteAdding()
{
    using (BlockingCollection<int> bc = new BlockingCollection<int>(1))
    {

        // Spin up a Task to populate the BlockingCollection  
        using (Task t1 = Task.Factory.StartNew(() =>
        {
            for (int i = 0; i < 100; i++)
            {
                if (bc.TryAdd(i))
                {
                    Debug.WriteLine("  add  " + i.ToString());
                }
                else
                {
                    Debug.WriteLine("  skip " + i.ToString());
                }

                Thread.Sleep(30);
            }
            bc.CompleteAdding();
        }))
        {

            // Spin up a Task to consume the BlockingCollection 
            using (Task t2 = Task.Factory.StartNew(() =>
            {
                try
                {
                    // Consume consume the BlockingCollection 
                    while (true)
                    {
                        Debug.WriteLine("take " + bc.Take());
                        Thread.Sleep(100);
                    }
                }
                catch (InvalidOperationException)
                {
                    // An InvalidOperationException means that Take() was called on a completed collection
                    Console.WriteLine("That's All!");
                }
            }))

                Task.WaitAll(t1, t2);
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
This isn't thread-safe. Multiple can enter this if (bc.Count == 0) and block on bc.Add(i); –  i3arnon Aug 7 '14 at 21:46
    
@I3arnon OK it think I have to agree with that it is not thread safe. Even in that case just that thread would be blocked until it was cleared - other threads would still skip. You would just get that one out of order. And the question did not indicate adding from multiple threads. –  Frisbee Aug 7 '14 at 21:51
    
"requests come from multiple threads." –  i3arnon Aug 7 '14 at 21:54
    
@I3arnon OK it does say "requests come from multiple threads". I missed that part. –  Frisbee Aug 7 '14 at 21:56

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