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I'm relatively new to programming and wanted to get some help on a problem I've have. I need to figure out a way to map the indices of a string back to an original string after removing certain positions. For example, say I had a list:

original_string = 'abcdefgh'

And I removed a few elements to get:

new_string = acfh

I need a way to get the "true" indices of new_string. In other words, I want the indices of the positions I've kept as they were in original_string. Thus returning:

original_indices_of_new_string = [0,2,5,7]

My general approach has been something like this:

I find the positions I've removed in the original_string to get:

removed_positions = [1,3,4,6]

Then given the indices of new_string:

new_string_indices = [0,1,2,3]

Then I think I should be able to do something like this:

original_indices_of_new_string = []   
for i in new_string_indices:
        offset = 0
        corrected_value = i + offset
        if corrected_value in removed_positions:
            #somehow offset to correct value
            offset+=1
        else:
            original_indices_of_new_string.append(corrected_value)

This doesn't really work because the offset is reset to 0 after every loop, which I only want to happen if the corrected_value is in removed_positions (ie. I want to offset 2 for removed_positions 3 and 4 but only 1 if consecutive positions weren't removed).

I need to do this based off positions I've removed rather than those I've kept because further down the line I'll be removing more positions and I'd like to just have an easy function to map those back to the original each time. I also can't just search for the parts I've removed because the real string isn't unique enough to guarantee that the correct portion gets found.

Any help would be much appreciated. I've been using stack overflow for a while now and have always found the question I've had in a previous thread but couldn't find something this time so I decided to post a question myself! Let me know if anything needs clarification.

*Letters in the string are a not unique

share|improve this question
    
How do you decide which elements to remove in the first place? – jonrsharpe Aug 7 '14 at 19:19
    
Are the letters in the string unique? I.e., a letter won't appear more than once? – chrisaycock Aug 7 '14 at 19:20
    
Letters in the string are not unique. The strings I'm actually working with a fairly long and have lots of repetition. This is the problem I've been attempting to address and why using something likes string.index() doesn't work. – user3919605 Aug 7 '14 at 21:23
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Given your string original_string = 'abcdefgh' you can create a tuple of the index, and character of each:

>>> li=[(i, c) for i, c in enumerate(original_string)]
>>> li
[(0, 'a'), (1, 'b'), (2, 'c'), (3, 'd'), (4, 'e'), (5, 'f'), (6, 'g'), (7, 'h')]

Then remove your desired charaters:

>>> new_li=[t for t in li if t[1] not in 'bdeg']
>>> new_li
[(0, 'a'), (2, 'c'), (5, 'f'), (7, 'h')]

Then rejoin that into a string:

>>> ''.join([t[1] for t in new_li])
acfh

Your 'answer' is the method used to create new_li and referring to the index there:

>>> ', '.join(map(str, (t[0] for t in new_li)))
0, 2, 5, 7
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! I had to a make a couple modifications for my actual purpose but that idea worked great. – user3919605 Aug 7 '14 at 22:57

You can create a new class to deal with this stuff

class String:
def __init__(self, myString):
    self.myString = myString
    self.myMap    = {}
    self.__createMapping(self.myString)

def __createMapping(self, myString):
    index = 0
    for character in myString:
        # If the character already exists in the map, append the index to the list
        if character in self.myMap:
            self.myMap[character].append(index)
        else:
            self.myMap[character] = [index,]
            index += 1

def removeCharacters(self, myList):
    for character in self.myString:
        if character in myList:
            self.myString = self.myString.replace(character, '')
            del self.myMap[character]
    return self.myString

def getIndeces(self):
    return self.myMap




if __name__ == '__main__':
    myString = String('abcdef')
    print myString.removeCharacters(['a', 'b']) # Prints cdef
    print myString.getIndeces() # Prints each character and a list of the indeces these occur at

This will give a mapping of the characters and a list of the indeces that they occur at. You can add more functionality if you want a single list returned, etc. Hopefully this gives you an idea of how to start

share|improve this answer

If removing by index, you simply need to start with a list of all indexes, e.g.: [0, 1, 2, 3, 4] and then, as you remove at each index, remove it from that list. For example, if you're removing indexes 1 and 3, you'll do:

idxlst.remove(1)
idxlst.remove(3)
idxlst  # => [0, 2, 4]

[update]: if not removing by index, it's probably easiest to find the index first and then proceed with the above solution, e.g. if removing 'c' from 'abc', do:

i = mystr.index('c')
# remove 'c'
idxlst.remove(i)
share|improve this answer

Trying to stay as close as possible to what you were originally trying to accomplish, this code should work:

big = 'abcdefgh'
small='acfh'

l = []
current = 0
while len(small) >0:
    if big[current] == small[0]:
        l.append(current)
        small = small[1:]
    else:
        current += 1
print(l)

The idea is working from the front so you don't need to worry about offset.

A precondition is of course that small actually is obtained by removing a few indices from big. Otherwise, an IndexError is thrown. If you need the code to be more robust, just catch the exception at the very end and return an empty list or something. Otherwise the code should work fine.

share|improve this answer

Assuming the character in your input string are unique, this is what is happening with your code:

original_indices_of_new_string = []   
for i in new_string_indices:
        offset = 0
        corrected_value = i + offset
        if corrected_value in removed_positions:
            #somehow offset to correct value
            offset+=1
        else:
            original_indices_of_new_string.append(corrected_value)

Setting offset to 0 every time in the loop is as good as having it preset to 0 outside the loop. And if you are adding 0 everytime to i in the loop, might as well use i. That boils down your code to:

if i in removed_positions:
    #somehow offset to correct value
    pass
else:
    original_indices_of_new_string.append(i)

This code gives the output as [0, 2] and the logic is right (again assuming the characters in the input are unique) What you should be doing is, running the loop for the length of the original_string. That will give you what you want. Like this:

original_indices_of_new_string = []
for i in range(len(original_string)):
    if i in removed_positions:
        #somehow offset to correct value
        pass
    else:
        original_indices_of_new_string.append(i)
print original_indices_of_new_string

This prints:

[0, 2, 5, 7]

A simpler one liner to achieve the same would be:

original_indices_of_new_string = [original_string.index(i) for i in new_string for j in i]

Hope this helps.

share|improve this answer

It may help to map the characters in the new string with their positions in the original string in a dictionary and recover the new string like this:

import operator
chars = {'a':0, 'c':2, 'f':6, 'h':8}
sorted_chars = sorted(chars.iteritems(), key=operator.itemgetter(1))
new_string = ''.join([char for char, pos in sorted_chars]) # 'acfh'
share|improve this answer

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