Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I would like to deploy a directory to multiple developers having different permissions. So this is one thing Git cannot do. What about creating two repositories in one directory and assigning them different file lists by excluding files managed by the other repository with the .gitignore file.

Example: /www/project/.git for all files execpt in /www/project/css /www/project/css/.git -> only files in this directory

Has anyone tried this solution? Or are there any better ways to handle this issue?

Regards, Jakob

share|improve this question
add comment

3 Answers 3

I suspect you're much better off permissioning your developers for comimits in either/both repositories. See also this server fault question.

share|improve this answer
    
I don't want to allow the access. Designers and people texting shouldn't be able to download the whole code. The second problem is that I would like to use GitHub and not an own server for handling the repositories, because GitHub is much more hassle-free. –  Jakob Mar 25 '10 at 21:30
add comment

It sounds like you want submodules. Any sub directories from the main repo can be submodules which are different git repositories.

http://book.git-scm.com/5_submodules.html

http://git-scm.com/docs/git-submodule

share|improve this answer
add comment

A less annoying approach than git-submodules (which are a pain to use) is gitslave Gitslave creates a group of related repositories—a superproject repository and a number of slave repositories—all of which are concurrently developed on and on which all git operations should normally operate; so when you branch, each repository in the project is branched in turn. Similarly when you commit, push, pull, merge, tag, checkout, status, log, etc; each git command will run on the superproject and all slave repositories in turn. This sort of activity may be very familiar to CVS and (to a lesser extent) Subversion users. Gitslave's design is for simplicity for normal git operations.

I'll also point you to etckeeper which does track permissions. It has its own peculiarities which may or may not make it usable for you.

Finally, I'll note you can have a custome post-checkout script which sets the appropriate permissions on the appropriate files/directories.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.